Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin
#11
  
I have turned a 14" long rolling pin made from hard maple with a Celtic Knot inlay, to which I am adding 4" handles at each end.  This will be used and not a decorative piece.  I came to the "rolling" part and am in a quandary.  I bought a 3/8" food grade ss rod for the pivot.  I will epoxy about 3" in each handle.  I plan on putting a nylon washer as a bushing between each handle and the roller.

My question involves mounting the rod.  I bought sealed roller bearings. I had planned on insetting one flush on each end, and having the ss shaft roll inside of them.  My concern is that these aren't very expensive, and so I question the viability of the "sealed" part.  Should the seal give up, then flour would get into the bearing and gum up the works.  With epoxied handles, this would be a death knell.

On the other hand, I could just put the ss rod through the roller and allow the roller to rotate directly on the rod.  The question then is what size the hole for the 3/8" rod?  25/64?  7/16?  1/2"?.  I want the roller to roll smoothly but not be sloppy.  I also don't want a place for flour to settle and get gummed up.

Go with the bearings?  If not, what size hole????
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#12
  Re: Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin by joemac (I have turned a 14" ...)
I would worry about water, grease and other baking products getting trapped behind the bearing. I have seen them just drilled and the rod freewheeling on the wood without the nylon. My suggestion would be one maybe two drill bit sizes over the 3/8 rod. Just make sure you have a clean hole through for smooth and easy rolling.
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#13
  Re: Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin by joemac (I have turned a 14" ...)
I made my rolling pin a solid object. The "handles" are from the same hunk of wood and is all one piece. It's easy for my hands to roll right along with the body of the pin.
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#14
  Re: Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin by joemac (I have turned a 14" ...)
Food ( Big Grin ) for thought! Would it be possible to anchor the handles onto the rod with some kind of allen screw? This would allow you the ability to disassemble the handles, ball bearings @ rod for cleaning.
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#15
  Re: Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin by joemac (I have turned a 14" ...)
1.  I'm a huge fan of Celtic Knots!!!!

2.  Is it possible you are over engineering this rolling pin?  We have two that date back to the 1940s and are still used.  Both are 100% wood, wooden dowel, and wooden handle.  I used one last week.  Yes bearings would be so smooth and a real joy until they weren't.

Best of luck, but more importantly, give us some pictures.
"I tried being reasonable..........I didn't like it." Clint Eastwood
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#16
  Re: Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin by joemac (I have turned a 14" ...)
Next time try making a french pin. They are simpler to make, more visually appealing, and nicer to use IMO.
"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
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#17
  Re: Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin by joemac (I have turned a 14" ...)
I made several different rolling pins;my wife prefers the french pins.


Rick
Any government that robs Peter to pay Paul, can always count on the support of Paul!
MAGA!!
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#18
  Re: Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin by joemac (I have turned a 14" ...)
I'm with the over-engineered and French style fudge *

I make (and sell) dozens a year, from 8 to 18 inches (other then the 30 inch one I made as a joke, that sold at the first show)
All French (handless)
Some with taper, some with no taper

*weird, my source says "folk" the post says "fudge"
Making sawdust mostly, sometimes I get something else, but that's more accident then design.
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#19
  Re: Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin by joemac (I have turned a 14" ...)
I also make celtic knot rolling pins. Make mine out of maple with contrasting wood for knots. I thought of using ball bearings also but changed my mind because of cost. I make mine with 3/8" aluminum rod. I drill mine with 1/2" through hole with 1" counterbores 3/8" to 1/2" deep and press fit Teflon bushings with oversized 3/8" hole in each end. They roll smooth as butter.
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#20
  Re: Question for anyone that turned a rolling pin by joemac (I have turned a 14" ...)
My daughter, the chef, uses rolling pins without separate handles—I think they’re called french rolling pins or a rod.
Gary

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