Ever Framed a Cutting Board?
#11
  
I made three rectangular cutting boards using quartersawn white oak, 12" x 16". They are an inch thick and the grain is running vertically with 90 glued up pieces each.  It seems that an outside wrap-around frame might set these boards off nicely, but it would have to be joined tightly, and I doubt mitered ends would be strong enough. If I make and attach frames, I'm, also not sure whether to use the same species or switch to another hardwood for a pleasant contrast.

Do you have any suggestions or Pics of your work? TIA.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#12
  Re: Ever Framed a Cutting Board? by Edwin Hackleman (I made three rectang...)
Could you make the “frame” with boards oriented the same as the others?
Carolyn

Trip Blog for Twelve Countries:   [url=http://www.woodworkingtraveler.wordpress.com[/url]

"It's good to know, but it's better to understand."  Auze Jackson
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#13
  Re: RE: Ever Framed a Cutting Board? by MsNomer (Could you make the “...)
(12-14-2019, 08:32 PM)MsNomer Wrote: Could you make the “frame” with boards oriented the same as the others?

Not really, Carolyn. These are all small boards with the grain running vertically -- 90 in all, glued up. It was quite a task. The technique was presented about 10 years or so ago in Wood  magazine. The pattern of each row is staggered as you move along. I maintained the same species, white oak, but Wood  showed several species in the same board for color contrast. I made three of those back then when the article was published. Needless to say, it's a lot of work but a rather unique project.

I can post a pic of where the project stands at this point without any outside frame if anyone is interested.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#14
  Re: Ever Framed a Cutting Board? by Edwin Hackleman (I made three rectang...)
Pic would help.

Seventeen.
Carolyn

Trip Blog for Twelve Countries:   [url=http://www.woodworkingtraveler.wordpress.com[/url]

"It's good to know, but it's better to understand."  Auze Jackson
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#15
  Re: Ever Framed a Cutting Board? by Edwin Hackleman (I made three rectang...)
Edwin, you wouldn’t happen to have that issue number of WOOD?

When I was turning I gathered several species of wood and now have leftovers that would fit a project like this. Personally I like the idea of the frame for a display board. Would love to see a pic of what you come up with.
Jim

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#16
  Re: RE: Ever Framed a Cutting Board? by stoppy (Edwin, you wouldn’t ...)
(12-15-2019, 04:28 AM)stoppy Wrote: Edwin, you wouldn’t happen to have that issue number of WOOD?

When I was turning I gathered several species of wood and now have leftovers that would fit a project like this. Personally I like the idea of the frame for a display board. Would love to see a pic of what you come up with.
Stoppy, you can take a look here:

https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/283114
or
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/woodw...ting-board

I made four very similar to this one. I used my 24" wide thickness sander. Once again I made three boards the same way with just one species -- white oak. Needless to say, it was a bear to sand smooth. White oak end grain is tough as nails.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#17
  Re: Ever Framed a Cutting Board? by Edwin Hackleman (I made three rectang...)
(12-14-2019, 08:12 PM)Edwin Hackleman Wrote: I made three rectangular cutting boards using quartersawn white oak, 12" x 16". They are an inch thick and the grain is running vertically with 90 glued up pieces each.  It seems that an outside wrap-around frame might set these boards off nicely, but it would have to be joined tightly, and I doubt mitered ends would be strong enough. If I make and attach frames, I'm, also not sure whether to use the same species or switch to another hardwood for a pleasant contrast.

Do you have any suggestions or Pics of your work? TIA.
Check out this picture of one of my many end grain cutting boards. All pieces (interior & boarder) are end grain. I do not miter the frame. Look at the picture and you can see the butt joints. The interior pieces (the pattern) are maple, walnut and cherry. The interior boarder is 1/8" wide maple and the exterior boarder is 3/4" wide walnut.

Is this the information you are looking for?


   
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#18
  Re: RE: Ever Framed a Cutting Board? by stoppy (Edwin, you wouldn’t ...)
(12-15-2019, 04:28 AM)stoppy Wrote: Edwin, you wouldn’t happen to have that issue number of WOOD?

Issue 172 October 2006
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#19
  Re: RE: Ever Framed a Cutting Board? by BigD ([quote='Edwin Hackle...)
(12-15-2019, 01:57 PM)BigD Wrote: Check out this picture of one of my many end grain cutting boards. All pieces (interior & boarder) are end grain. I do not miter the frame. Look at the picture and you can see the butt joints. The interior pieces (the pattern) are maple, walnut and cherry. The interior boarder is 1/8" wide maple and the exterior boarder is 3/4" wide walnut.

Is this the information you are looking for?
Yes, BigD, and thank you. My only fear is that the cutting boards I just made will wind up hanging on the wall and never be used on the kitchen counter to cut any food. I've already given away to friends a half dozen cutting boards that wound on the wall, never to be used. Thanks again. Yours shown here is beautiful and truly a work of art.
Rip to width. Plane to thickness. Cut to length. Join.
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#20
  Re: RE: Ever Framed a Cutting Board? by Edwin Hackleman ([quote='BigD' pid='7...)
(12-15-2019, 04:00 PM)Edwin Hackleman Wrote: Yes, BigD, and thank you. My only fear is that the cutting boards I just made will wind up hanging on the wall and never be used on the kitchen counter to cut any food. I've already given away to friends a half dozen cutting boards that wound on the wall, never to be used. Thanks again. Yours shown here is beautiful and truly a work of art.

I wish mine would get used as well. I give them hoping they are put to use.
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