Which LN rabbet plane: 610 or 10-1/4
#7
  
So, I've been doing a lot of large scale joinery recently. Specifically, cutting half lap joints in 4x4's for tables that I'm building. I've been using a backsaw to cut the shoulders of the joint then I make multiple cuts in the waste and use a chisel to remove the bulk of the waste. A router with an upcut spiral bit performs cleanup duty. I prefer making joints with hand tools and to that end, I'd like to purchase a jack-sized rabbet plane and I was wondering if anyone had opinions as to which of the LN rabbet planes, the 610 or the 10-1/4, is more versatile. I'd be using the plane mainly for joinery: half-laps, bread-board ends etc with the potential for some panel raising in the future. I'd appreciate thoughts and input from anyone that has experience with either or both of these planes.


Attached Files Image(s)
   
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." --Benjamin Franklin
Reply
#8
  Re: Which LN rabbet plane: 610 or 10-1/4 by dave brown (So, I've been doing ...)
Dave, I’m not keen on either of those planes for joinery.

I’d rather use a router plane for tuning half-lap joints, and a rebate plane for breadboard tenons. A moving filester, such as the Veritas Skew Rabbet plane would be my choice for the latter. The large bench planes, like a #10 1/2, do not have a depth stop, and this can make the task more difficult.

For fine tuning rebates and breadboards, I would rather use a wide shoulder plane, such as one with a 1 - 1-1/4” blade. I have the LN rabbet block plane, and it could be pressed into service here. However, it lacks the vertical orientation that is so helpful in a shoulder plane when squaring corners.

Regards from Munich

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
Reply
#9
  Re: Which LN rabbet plane: 610 or 10-1/4 by dave brown (So, I've been doing ...)
Or...just find a Vintage Stanley #140.....remove the side plate for the rebate, install the plate for a block plane.....

Might be a bit hard to find an Auburn No. 181, though..
   
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
Reply
#10
  Re: Which LN rabbet plane: 610 or 10-1/4 by dave brown (So, I've been doing ...)
I don't know the plane numbers, but I've got an old stanley that's about the same length as a #4 that I've used to do some timber framing joints and I really like it. The LN planes look to be about the size of a #5. I haven't used the longer plane, but I think the #4 length is perfect for what you are describing. So throwing out another option to go vintage, but I personally like a carriage makers plane for the task you describe vs some of the other options on this thread. That being said, I hate to try to talk someone out of buying a LN plane. Of the two planes you listed, I'd get the 610 myself.
Reply
#11
  Re: Which LN rabbet plane: 610 or 10-1/4 by dave brown (So, I've been doing ...)
Thank you for your thoughts guys. I ended up ordering the 610. I'll let you know how I get along with it after a few projects. First up will be finishing our Thanksgiving table. For cutting the breadboard tenons, I ordered some longer fence rods for my Veritas skew rabbet plane. I'll use it to cut the shoulders of breadboard tenon and then remove the remainder of the waste with the 610.
"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." --Benjamin Franklin
Reply
#12
  Re: Which LN rabbet plane: 610 or 10-1/4 by dave brown (So, I've been doing ...)
I thought I would cross-reference another forum's old posting.   Along about post #2 in this thread the talented guy brought in a carriage-makers / rabbeting plane.   This really impressed me when I saw it back around 2011.   I think the guy has moved on to mostly metal-shop stuff since those years....

https://www.shopsmith.com/ss_forum/gener...t9164.html


Chris
Chris
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.