King scroll saw
#21
  Re: King scroll saw by Timberwolf (Any good??????? I'm ...)
By all accounts, Hegner is a great saw, but expensive.  It may not be as user friendly as some of the Excalibur clones, but from what I understand, they are practically bullet proof.  Guys who have them love them.
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

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#22
  Re: RE: King scroll saw by Bill Wilson (By all accounts, Heg...)
(12-31-2019, 11:45 AM)Bill Wilson Wrote: By all accounts, Hegner is a great saw, but expensive.  It may not be as user friendly as some of the Excalibur clones, but from what I understand, they are practically bullet proof.  Guys who have them love them.

I have a Hegner made in West Germany in 1988 and bought it in almost new condition about ten years ago for $360. I expect the newer designs are superior, but it has been very dependable.
Cellulose runs through my veins!
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#23
  Re: RE: King scroll saw by SteveS ([quote='Bill Wilson'...)
(12-31-2019, 12:19 PM)SteveS Wrote: I have a Hegner made in West Germany in 1988 and bought it in almost new condition about ten years ago for $360. I expect the newer designs are superior, but it has been very dependable.

....................
Here's a Hegner on Craigslist... located about 125 miles from me...it's very tempting....... Crazy

https://ocala.craigslist.org/tls/d/leesb...02650.html
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#24
  Re: King scroll saw by Timberwolf (Any good??????? I'm ...)
The only downside I've ever heard about Hegner is that it isn't as easy to make blade changes for fretwork (interior cuts).  That can be a deal breaker for someone who does a lot of that type of scrolling or is already used to Ex/DeWalt style saws.  If you are just using it as a mini-bandsaw, for arcs and curves, then it would be great.  That said, I know a couple guys from my scroll saw club that have Hegners and are able to do fretwork just fine.  If you don't have any background or experience with anything else, you would get used to it and really wouldn't know any different.  I do think you can get a blade clamp upgrade for some models to make fretwork a little easier, but I'm really stretching my knowledge of Hegner in this thread, so I wouldn't swear to anything.   Winkgrin
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

http://blazinbladesscrollers.webs.com/
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#25
  Re: RE: King scroll saw by Bill Wilson (The only downside I'...)
(12-31-2019, 03:01 PM)Bill Wilson Wrote: The only downside I've ever heard about Hegner is that it isn't as easy to make blade changes for fretwork (interior cuts).  That can be a deal breaker for someone who does a lot of that type of scrolling or is already used to Ex/DeWalt style saws.  If you are just using it as a mini-bandsaw, for arcs and curves, then it would be great.  That said, I know a couple guys from my scroll saw club that have Hegners and are able to do fretwork just fine.  If you don't have any background or experience with anything else, you would get used to it and really wouldn't know any different.  I do think you can get a blade clamp upgrade for some models to make fretwork a little easier, but I'm really stretching my knowledge of Hegner in this thread, so I wouldn't swear to anything.   Winkgrin

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One thing I have noticed Bill, is these higher end machines all appear to have been made in the same factory, or at least to the same specs.....I have a Woodcraft about a half mile from me and they stock both King and Jet..They frequently have the Jet on sale at 10% off..I am strongly considering checking the Jet out ahead of time, but waiting until the sale to spring for one. I do appreciate all your help... Winkgrin
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#26
  Re: King scroll saw by Timberwolf (Any good??????? I'm ...)
I will only say this about the Jet...It is limited to bottom feeding and requires a tool to change blades.  Most other saws of this design use thumbscrews on both the top & bottom clamps.  This may or may not matter to you, but it is kind of a big deal in the scrolling community.  Those who are used to Hegners, for example, are familiar with the barrel type blade holders that the Jet uses.  But for anyone used to an EX or DeWalt, this would be a problem, especially if they typically top feed.  By bottom and top feed, I mean how you thread the blade through entry holes for inside cuts.  The upper arms of these types of saw will lift up.  Most will stay up on their own, but the DeWalt requires an aftermarket accessory to hold the arm up.  The arm lifting up makes it really easy to thread the blade for fretwork.  If you top feed, that means you leave the blade attached at the top clamp and feed the blade down through the hole and secure it in the bottom clamp.  This isn't possible with the Jet, because of the pre-loaded blade barrel attached to the bottom of the blade.  Again, may not matter and otherwise I'm sure this is a fine saw.  I'm a bottom feeder, which means I remove the top of the blade from it's clamp and feed it through the hole in the wood, from the bottom and reattach the top.  No right or wrong way, just how you get used to it.  

Otherwise, the tilting feature on the Jet, as well as some of the other similar design saws, is great.  If you do beveled cuts, you will appreciate this.  The saw body tilts instead of the table (like on the DeWalt and Porter Cable).  It's controlled by a locking rack & pinion mechanism that is really solid and stable.  I love it on my EX and much prefer it over the tilting table on my old DeWalt.

Whatever saw you get, I highly recommend getting a footswitch for it.  The factory stands are also very nice and allow you to tilt the saw forward slightly, for better ergonomics, if desired.  No problem mounting these to a home made stand, a bench or other surface of your choosing though.  Screw it down and it should run very smoothly.

Sorry for rambling on & on, but we don't get too many scroll saw threads on this forum, so I get a little carried away.   Laugh
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

http://blazinbladesscrollers.webs.com/
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#27
  Re: RE: King scroll saw by Bill Wilson ([quote='Timberwolf' ...)
(12-30-2019, 01:02 PM)Bill Wilson Wrote:   All based on that design and made in Taiwan.  This would include the King, Seyco, Jet and Pegas, as well as Excelsior (which I don't think is available in the US).  

great info from bill. one thing id add to these brands is how the customer service/support is. the only one i am familiar with is seyco. top notch. if necessary to call or email, ray is who replies or answers the phone and he knows the saws inside and out.
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#28
  Re: RE: King scroll saw by Bill Wilson (I will only say this...)
(12-31-2019, 04:59 PM)Bill Wilson Wrote: I will only say this about the Jet...It is limited to bottom feeding and requires a tool to change blades.  Most other saws of this design use thumbscrews on both the top & bottom clamps.  This may or may not matter to you, but it is kind of a big deal in the scrolling community.  Those who are used to Hegners, for example, are familiar with the barrel type blade holders that the Jet uses.  But for anyone used to an EX or DeWalt, this would be a problem, especially if they typically top feed.  By bottom and top feed, I mean how you thread the blade through entry holes for inside cuts.  The upper arms of these types of saw will lift up.  Most will stay up on their own, but the DeWalt requires an aftermarket accessory to hold the arm up.  The arm lifting up makes it really easy to thread the blade for fretwork.  If you top feed, that means you leave the blade attached at the top clamp and feed the blade down through the hole and secure it in the bottom clamp.  This isn't possible with the Jet, because of the pre-loaded blade barrel attached to the bottom of the blade.  Again, may not matter and otherwise I'm sure this is a fine saw.  I'm a bottom feeder, which means I remove the top of the blade from it's clamp and feed it through the hole in the wood, from the bottom and reattach the top.  No right or wrong way, just how you get used to it.  

Otherwise, the tilting feature on the Jet, as well as some of the other similar design saws, is great.  If you do beveled cuts, you will appreciate this.  The saw body tilts instead of the table (like on the DeWalt and Porter Cable).  It's controlled by a locking rack & pinion mechanism that is really solid and stable.  I love it on my EX and much prefer it over the tilting table on my old DeWalt.

Whatever saw you get, I highly recommend getting a footswitch for it.  The factory stands are also very nice and allow you to tilt the saw forward slightly, for better ergonomics, if desired.  No problem mounting these to a home made stand, a bench or other surface of your choosing though.  Screw it down and it should run very smoothly.

Sorry for rambling on & on, but we don't get too many scroll saw threads on this forum, so I get a little carried away.   Laugh

................
Well Bill, that cinches it for me...the Jet is out because of what you just pointed out...I was not aware of those limitations..I would be a bottom feeder also..so I will continue to "kick the tires" and probably settle on the King, Excalibur, Pegas or Seyco...I am quite used to using a foot switch, both on my DP, belt grinders and even my router table. They make both hands available to hold the work safely.
I love the Corps for those intangible possessions that cannot be
issued: pride, honor, integrity, and being able to carry on the
traditions for generations of warriors past. [Cpl. Jeff Sornij, USMC;
in Navy Times, November 1994]


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#29
  Re: RE: King scroll saw by Timberwolf ([quote='Bill Wilson'...)
(12-31-2019, 10:31 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: ................
Well Bill, that cinches it for me...the Jet is out because of what you just pointed out...I was not aware of those limitations..I would be a bottom feeder also..so I will continue to "kick the tires" and probably settle on the King, Excalibur, Pegas or Seyco...I am quite used to using a foot switch, both on my DP, belt grinders and even my router table. They make both hands available to hold the work safely.

i also wouldnt have faith in the excalibur since the move to china. i have an ex16 made in taiwan and its awesome. i have over 1000 hours on it over the last 5 years. no major problems. had to replace the speed control and the blade clamps. blade clamps are understandable- theres a LOT of clamping and unclamping.
but the new made in china excalibur- ive read quite a bit of hit n miss on quality. more negative than positive.
seyco is the made in taiwan excalibur. i havent read anything negative about them.
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#30
  Re: RE: King scroll saw by Bill Wilson ([quote='Timberwolf' ...)
(12-30-2019, 01:02 PM)Bill Wilson Wrote: The bottom line is, the King should be every bit as good as the Excalibur was.  I think they are only available in the 16" and 30" sizes, in the US.  

It looks like King now has a 21" model

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