Clamp-on vise question
#11
  
I've been looking for a small clamp-on vise that I can attach to our picnic table in the backyard for small jobs. (Right now I use a Moxon vise, but it's a little unwieldy.) I've seen a number of Record vises called Record Junior 51. They seem pretty much what I'm looking for. Here's my question: Some of them--the less expensive ones, of course, including one that's pretty close to me--are missing the round metal plate that attaches to the end of the clamping screw, leaving simply the end of the screw where it would push up against the bottom of the table. Can this part be replaced somehow? Or should I look for a vise that's complete?
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#12
  Re: Clamp-on vise question by overland (I've been looking fo...)
I've never found a pretty way to replace one of those without sacrificing one from a C-Clamp or something of the sort.  Otherwise, closest DIY solution I've ever attempted was making a replacement effectively out of a stack of washers with one solid piece on the face end.  On the opposite end I used a washer with a hole smaller than the ball end of the screw and cut a slot on one end (making it a U) so that I could slip it under the ball.  Epoxied the stack together (in place) and it worked but was a bit of a mess making it all come together.   

On cheaper models, I've seen that piece effectively formed out of a thin disc of metal.  Draw lines from center out to segment the disk into 8-12 pieces like a pie then cut in on your lines a bit.  Fold the outer flaps in to sort of make a cone shape but leave just enough of an opening for your ball end to enter the tip of the cone then close it up and enclose the ball.  Again, not terribly pretty but would get the job done.
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#13
  Re: Clamp-on vise question by overland (I've been looking fo...)
(12-31-2019, 01:05 PM)overland Wrote: I've been looking for a small clamp-on vise that I can attach to our picnic table in the backyard for small jobs. (Right now I use a Moxon vise, but it's a little unwieldy.) I've seen a number of Record vises called Record Junior 51. They seem pretty much what I'm looking for. Here's my question: Some of them--the less expensive ones, of course, including one that's pretty close to me--are missing the round metal plate that attaches to the end of the clamping screw, leaving simply the end of the screw where it would push up against the bottom of the table. Can this part be replaced somehow? Or should I look for a vise that's complete?

you can always clamp a hand screw to the bench as a vise    jerry
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#14
  Re: Clamp-on vise question by overland (I've been looking fo...)
(12-31-2019, 01:05 PM)overland Wrote: I've been looking for a small clamp-on vise that I can attach to our picnic table in the backyard for small jobs. (Right now I use a Moxon vise, but it's a little unwieldy.) I've seen a number of Record vises called Record Junior 51. They seem pretty much what I'm looking for. Here's my question: Some of them--the less expensive ones, of course, including one that's pretty close to me--are missing the round metal plate that attaches to the end of the clamping screw, leaving simply the end of the screw where it would push up against the bottom of the table. Can this part be replaced somehow? Or should I look for a vise that's complete?

McMaster Carr sells replacement c-clamp pads. Or if you have access to a metal lathe, they would not be hard to make.


Bob Page
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In da U.P. of Michigan
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#15
  Re: Clamp-on vise question by overland (I've been looking fo...)
The McMaster-Carr pads assume a ball on the end of the spindle, and clamp-on vises rarely have that.

I'd have to go look at my Record Junior, but I believe it uses the approach common on clamp-on vises: the end of the spindle is turned down, and the clamping "pad" is essentially a large, thick washer (not all round: some are oval or otherwise interesting), with a dome in the center; the dome goes down, and the hole is sized so that the turned-down end of the spindle goes through and is then peened over so the washer doesn't fall off.

Look around for an old hand meat grinder. They have almost no market value, and often have really sturdy pads/washers.  Get the pad off by hacksawing through the spindle, next to the threaded portion, and use it on your Record vise.

One note on the Junior: the wood is held higher than the top level of your sawhorse or portable bench.  Not an issue for short stock, but it can be a problem for long work, so have a stick that you can clamp to your horse/bench, sticking out far enough to catch the lower edge of a long board.
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#16
  Re: RE: Clamp-on vise question by enjuneer ([quote='overland' pi...)
(12-31-2019, 04:30 PM)enjuneer Wrote: McMaster Carr sells replacement c-clamp pads. Or if you have access to a metal lathe, they would not be hard to make.



......................
You could also make them out of brass or aluminum on a wood lathe using wood turning tools.
"Retreat hell, we are attacking in a different direction"
Col. Chesty Puller C/O Ist Marines....Chosin Reservoir 1950
Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#17
  Re: Clamp-on vise question by overland (I've been looking fo...)
it doesn't need to be round.  Or even made of metal. The right size fender washer and a piece of wood will work. Clamp it in the vise when it's not in use.
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#18
  Re: RE: Clamp-on vise question by EricU (it doesn't need to b...)
(01-03-2020, 09:55 AM)EricU Wrote: it doesn't need to be round.  Or even made of metal. The right size fender washer and a piece of wood will work. Clamp it in the vise when it's not in use.
Simple, quick, DIY with common tools - you are a rebel, Sir...
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#19
  Re: Clamp-on vise question by overland (I've been looking fo...)
and I even have a metal lathe.  It's just that there is no reason to put too much effort into something like this.
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#20
  Re: Clamp-on vise question by overland (I've been looking fo...)
Ever checked out a zyliss vise?


Glad its my shop I am responsible for - I only have to make me happy.

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