Bookcase tip over hazard?
#21
  Re: Bookcase tip over hazard? by ed kerns (I'm building a bookc...)
There is a third way of anchoring - locate two to three studs and screw the back on the top shelf area to the studs. This is a better method if there is no headroom to install the L-shaped anchors.

Simon
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#22
  Re: RE: Bookcase tip over hazard? by Cooler ([quote='brianwelch' ...)
(01-08-2020, 09:19 AM)Cooler Wrote: It would be more work than necessary.  It might require cutting a relief in the base molding and if the wall is not perfectly plumb it might leave a gap at the bottom of the bookcase where the bottom meets the flooring.
  
Agreed...just trying to open my mind to other ideas...
Thanks
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#23
  Re: RE: Bookcase tip over hazard? by brianwelch ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(01-08-2020, 10:37 AM)brianwelch Wrote:   
Agreed...just trying to open my mind to other ideas...
Thanks

On the other hand, furniture sometimes blocks baseboard heat units.  "Floating" a bookcase above the baseboard will greatly improve the efficiency of the baseboard heat.  In that case a French cleat (robustly attached to the wall) might be advisable.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#24
  Re: Bookcase tip over hazard? by ed kerns (I'm building a bookc...)
(01-07-2020, 02:56 PM)ed kerns Wrote: I'm building a bookcase for a customer. It is 21" wide, 14 1/2 deep and 88" tall and is of solid hickory except for a plywood back. There are 6 fixed shelves spaced at about 13 1/2". The shelves are built specifically to house scrapbooks and the dimensions are specified by the customer. In and of itself, this is a very stable piece, but I'm wondering if because of it's height and the shelves, it shouldn't be anchored to the wall? I'm in Michigan, so earthquakes aren't a problem, but I can see the potential of a young child using it as a ladder...
Interestingly as I write this, I've convinced myself that a wall anchor is the right thing to do Yes , but I'm curious have any of you run into a similar situation? Do you know of a standard governing such things? Certainly pull out drawers would make a huge difference. Thank you.

.........................
I can remember two small children in my general area who were killed in separate accidents a few years apart, by cabinets tipping over on them...I would include some means of anchoring it to a wall........
"Retreat hell, we are attacking in a different direction"
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#25
  Re: Bookcase tip over hazard? by ed kerns (I'm building a bookc...)
Anything that is taller than wide, I put an anchor in the wall. Cheap insurance to keep the kids safe. There are basic kits that you can get that use a zip tie between a couple of loops that go both on the wall and the cabinet.
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#26
  Re: Bookcase tip over hazard? by ed kerns (I'm building a bookc...)
School setting, bookcases taller than 36” were anchored.
Additionally, adjustable  shelving was installed with the no-tip clips.

Probably for liability reasons, but regardless, it improves the safety factor.
As to method, it varied, usually those L-brackets.  On the shorter bookcases where the top was visible and would be used for additional things they drilled from just below the top and screwed to the wall, similar to a base cabinet.

If you go this route you will probably be adding filler strips to match the width of the floor base trim.  But, you were probably already doing this as an 88” case would need to be scribed to the wall anyway.
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#27
  Re: Bookcase tip over hazard? by ed kerns (I'm building a bookc...)
The plan for this tall Woodsmith Mag bookcase calls for levelers on the front corners forcing it to lean toward the wall.


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#28
  Re: RE: Bookcase tip over hazard? by Rick LoDico (The plan for this ta...)
(01-11-2020, 01:39 PM)Rick LoDico Wrote: The plan for this tall Woodsmith Mag bookcase calls for levelers on the front corners forcing it to lean toward the wall.
I like this idea Rick. I think I'll use it in addition to a wall anchor. I've occasionally run into situations where the tackless strip in a carpeted room wants to tilt a cabinet away from the wall. Thank you.
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#29
  Re: RE: Bookcase tip over hazard? by ed kerns ([quote='Rick LoDico'...)
(01-11-2020, 10:21 PM)ed kerns Wrote: I like this idea Rick. I think I'll use it in addition to a wall anchor. I've occasionally run into situations where the tackless strip in a carpeted room wants to tilt a cabinet away from the wall. Thank you.
I built a 4 foot tall book case for a local retailer with leveling feet and tipped it backwards.  For a 4' tall unit I think that is fine.  But for a taller one, I  would want to anchor it.

Logically you would place the heavier stuff on the bottom and that would work fine.  Illogically, the case gets loaded with the heavier stuff up high and you have an issue. 

Illogicality seems to rule more often that you might expect.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#30
  Re: Bookcase tip over hazard? by ed kerns (I'm building a bookc...)
We have (3) tall Ikea bookcases.

I secured the top of them to wall studs with 2" angle thingies... those 3/4" wide angle pieces with pre-drilled holes.

If we had young kids, I'd probably boost up the security with a 3" x 24" hardwood strip in the top and use 2" long screws into the bookcase top as well as into the studs.
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