Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick
#41
  Re: RE: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by wrb ([quote='Snipe Hunter...)
(01-16-2020, 01:50 AM)wrb Wrote: I will find out on Saturday.  Thanks to everyone, I think I have a good plan with removing the door and if needed the whole dishwasher by taking it apart in place to gain access from behind to remove the toe kick section.

If you can try using velcro to put it back or magnets
Phydeaux said "Loving your enemy and doing good for those that hurt you does not preclude killing them if they make that necessary."


Phil Thien

women have trouble understanding Trump's MAGA theme because they had so little involvement in making America great the first time around.

Reply
#42
  Re: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by wrb (In our kitchen, toe ...)
Magnets work great.  We have regular baseboards in our kitchen. I cut a piece to go
under the DW and used several to keep it there. LOML has never even noticed.
Big Grin
Mark Singleton

Bene vivendo est optimum vindictae
Reply
#43
  Re: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by wrb (In our kitchen, toe ...)
We use velcro on some kicks that have to be removed
Reply
#44
  Re: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by wrb (In our kitchen, toe ...)
Wanted to provide an update on where I ended up with.

I first removed the existing DW door to gain some access to the toe kick from behind.  However, it was glued so well, it did not separate with any reasonable attempt to remove it.  I ended up cutting  it with a diamond blade using Fein MultiMaster.  It was not that difficult and to my amazement I was able to make both of the cuts using only one the 4 blades that came in the pack selling for $18 per pack on Amazon.  I pointed the vacuum hose to the cut location which captured basically all the dust.

When I installed the new DW, I realized I would have to cut the toe kick anyway as it turns out my old DW, a Bosch was about 2" less deep than the new one, a Kitchen Aid.  While the cavity depth is standard and sufficient, on the back wall at the top I have a waste water pipe that is partially on the surface preventing pushing the DW more.  So, with the new one the bottom of DW is aligned with the toe kick, no space to install the quartz toe kick back.

On another note, the new Kitchen Aid DW is definitely behind Bosch in quality.  I am considering returning it, but don't want to go through the hassle...  So may end up keeping it to replace with another Bosch when the time comes. 

Thanks again for all the suggestions and tips.
Reply
#45
  Re: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by wrb (In our kitchen, toe ...)
On another note, the new Kitchen Aid DW is definitely behind Bosch in quality

Yup, probably all of them are. We just put in a new one (GE) but there was a Bosch demo at HD for about $800. Really thought about buying it but no warranty so skipped it. I have a 3 year old Whirlpool strapped to a hand-truck in the garage. Free for the taking. Almost all the parts have been replaced in the last 3 years. The heating element twice.
 
"Every time Bloomberg speaks a Trump voter gets their wings"
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections

Reply
#46
  Re: RE: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by Snipe Hunter ([b][color=#3333ff]On...)
(01-24-2020, 06:47 PM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: On another note, the new Kitchen Aid DW is definitely behind Bosch in quality

Yup, probably all of them are. We just put in a new one (GE) but there was a Bosch demo at HD for about $800. Really thought about buying it but no warranty so skipped it. I have a 3 year old Whirlpool strapped to a hand-truck in the garage. Free for the taking. Almost all the parts have been replaced in the last 3 years. The heating element twice.

I made the mistake of ordering online from Costco without seeing the actual unit.  If I can convince myself to go through the return hassle, it will definitely go back.  Because I ended up installing it myself, I was able to see all the design and material deficiencies. Some of them are so stupid, you would wonder if any engineer looked at the end product at the end of the design / prototype before going into mass production.  A great one is a plastic screw used to hold the insulation layer with a pointy sharp end facing the back, exactly where the water supply hose and the waste hose are going through.There is no way to ensure that screw is not pushing against the hoses, because it is behind the unit and can't be seen from the small hole used to run the hoses under the sink for hookup.  This is my biggest beef.  This is what I could easily see from the outside, who knows what other stupidities are unseen...  I will probably return as I don't want to end up with major water damage (our kitchen is on the top floor) because of that screw or other deficiencies.  If I knew I would get 5 years trouble free performance I would not bother, but it is unlikely...
Reply
#47
  Re: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by wrb (In our kitchen, toe ...)
It's too bad that the hookups on dishwashers aren't standard. I had to change ours out this summer and had to do some re configuring of both electrical and plumbing to make the new one work. It shouldn't be that big of a deal. Our new one is a Bosch, and they make a ton of different models and even they aren't the same. We bought ours from a local store that had to order it so I thought I would have it all ready, but couldn't until I could physically see what I got. Online manual was way too vague.
Reply
#48
  Re: RE: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by wrb ([quote='Snipe Hunter...)
(01-24-2020, 07:20 PM)wrb Wrote: I made the mistake of ordering online from Costco without seeing the actual unit.  If I can convince myself to go through the return hassle, it will definitely go back.  Because I ended up installing it myself, I was able to see all the design and material deficiencies. Some of them are so stupid, you would wonder if any engineer looked at the end product at the end of the design / prototype before going into mass production.  A great one is a plastic screw used to hold the insulation layer with a pointy sharp end facing the back, exactly where the water supply hose and the waste hose are going through.There is no way to ensure that screw is not pushing against the hoses, because it is behind the unit and can't be seen from the small hole used to run the hoses under the sink for hookup.  This is my biggest beef.  This is what I could easily see from the outside, who knows what other stupidities are unseen...  I will probably return as I don't want to end up with major water damage (our kitchen is on the top floor) because of that screw or other deficiencies.  If I knew I would get 5 years trouble free performance I would not bother, but it is unlikely...

You've just described 90% of the dishwashers on the market.
Code says it must be plugged into an accessible GFCI receptacle. I knew that so I installed one under the sink. Most also have that sharp metal tab holding the back of the insulation in place too. It doesn't take much to tear off the insulation so I use some gorilla tape to hold it in place and cut off, or bend over the tab. It only needs to work once.

Your discharge hose is probably fastened in place and looped up on the side of the washer. Called a "hi loop". It should stay looped high like that. But the low end at the rear should be able to be disconnected and routed inside the frame and out the lower back of the frame. There's usually plenty of space at the rear of the base of the frame. This will prevent the discharge hose from catching on that sharp tab. It also prevents the hose from making a sharp turn going into the sink cabinet and helps prevent it from kinking. It makes installation easier too because there's more slack left so connections can be made with the dishwasher a little further away from the cabinet. A lot of "real" plumbers use a rubber or meshed vinyl hose in place of the corrugated plastic hose. These flow better and food doesn't get hung up in the corrugations. Also easier to pull through the hole in the sink cabinet and you can make it longer, again to make it easy for connections with the washer further from the cabinet.

The supplied hoses and power cords are a little short for my liking. The pwr cord for the GE washer was shorter than I like so I just made up a new one about 18" longer. Made installation easier. I just used a metal strain relief at the washer connection. The supplied one had a molded plastic strain relief.

I did struggle to get this washer in. It uses a customer installed rubber gasket around the door opening. The instructions were very poor. The gasket interferes with the two mounting brackets on the sides of the washer. I hadn't seen this configuration before. It made no mention of having to fold the gasket over on itself to make clearance for the brackets. I've put in a lot of washers and hadn't bumped into it prior to this one. Also, any install videos I could fine completely skipped this part.

Also, the adjustable feet were terrible. Only one was installed 90 deg to the bottom of the frame. The frame wasn't bent. The adjustable feet holes obviously weren't drilled and tapped by a robot. If it didn't frustrate me so much, it would have been comical.  And, the top of the threaded shaft has a tiny hex head, not mentioned in the install instructions. If I have a socket that small, I can't find it. Real tiny. Since the adjustable feet weren't at 90 degrees, they would catch on the floor and turn when sliding in the washer. The feet have 6 sides like a bolt head so when I turned them to adjust for level there were high and low spots. Made it difficult to turn them. If they were sitting flat, they would turn easily.

Fortunately, once it's in... it's in.
 
"Every time Bloomberg speaks a Trump voter gets their wings"
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections

Reply
#49
  Re: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by wrb (In our kitchen, toe ...)
I ended up returning the Kitchen Aid and purchased another Bosch.  The new Bosch, similar to the old one, is far better designed and made.  Fits perfectly in the space as well.  It was about 60% more expensive, but based on this experience I don't think I will buy any other brand in the future so long as Bosch quality remains similarly high.
Reply
#50
  Re: RE: Cutting quartz countertop - cabinet toe kick by wrb (I ended up returning...)
(02-06-2020, 04:47 PM)wrb Wrote: I ended up returning the Kitchen Aid and purchased another Bosch.  The new Bosch, similar to the old one, is far better designed and made.  Fits perfectly in the space as well.  It was about 60% more expensive, but based on this experience I don't think I will buy any other brand in the future so long as Bosch quality remains similarly high.

Funny when Bosch started making dishwashers all the fancy houses I catered in had them for a short time then all were tossed out.  They were problematic at best, seems they figured out how to build them now, although I was told by a repair guy they are impossible to work on
Phydeaux said "Loving your enemy and doing good for those that hurt you does not preclude killing them if they make that necessary."


Phil Thien

women have trouble understanding Trump's MAGA theme because they had so little involvement in making America great the first time around.

Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)