How would you handle this?
#9
  
Take a look at this cabinet by Craig Vandall Stevens. (Amazing cabinet IMO, by the way -- Krenov was a great teacher). See the transition on the legs, right where the actual cabinet starts? The legs going from larger to smaller size with an angled step between? I want to do something somewhat similar, on a somewhat smaller scale though. My leg profile will be rounded (I think his is also; mine might be more rounded). Overall, the rounding is easy with planes or spokeshaves. That transition, and the region just above it, look tricky. I don't see a strategy for it, especially when the faces are not flat.

CVS cabinet

I've wanted to do this for a long time. It's time. How would you approach it?

Thanks all.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#10
  Re: How would you handle this? by Aram (Take a look at this ...)
Aram, it is pretty straight-forward: imagine the legs are straight. Build with them this way. Shape the legs once all the joinery is done.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#11
  Re: RE: How would you handle this? by Derek Cohen (Aram, it is pretty s...)
(01-18-2020, 11:19 PM)Derek Cohen Wrote: Aram, it is pretty straight-forward: imagine the legs are straight. Build with them this way. Shape the legs once all the joinery is done.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Hi Derek,

Thanks. I thought of that, and I have done it before with flat leg transitions to wider flat legs. That strikes me as a lot easier though.

What tools would you use to put a rounded face on the top area just north of the bevel? I can use a spokeshave to round the faces of the legs. But even a spokeshave won't (obviously) get all the way to the bottom of the top section. If that makes sense. So... whole lotta chisel work there?
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
Reply
#12
  Re: How would you handle this? by Aram (Take a look at this ...)
Hi Aram

I would likely use a rasp and file to shape the rounded face, and then smooth it down, as well as final shaping, with scrapers. I would not use a chisel, except in the corners.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#13
  Re: RE: How would you handle this? by Derek Cohen (Hi Aram I would l...)
(01-19-2020, 02:06 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: Hi Aram

I would likely use a rasp and file to shape the rounded face, and then smooth it down, as well as final shaping, with scrapers. I would not use a chisel, except in the corners.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Thanks, Derek
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#14
  Re: How would you handle this? by Aram (Take a look at this ...)
Fine detail is accented best in sharp contrasts. 

Pekovich did a 27, or so, inch table laid out in similar way with legs in less than a 1.5-inch section. In the sketch the leg tapers from 1-1/4" (largest) to 5/8" at the foot. I am sure his detail is the same.

   
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#15
  Re: RE: How would you handle this? by hbmcc (Fine detail is accen...)
(01-19-2020, 10:36 AM)hbmcc Wrote: Fine detail is accented best in sharp contrasts. 

Pekovich did a 27, or so, inch table laid out in similar way with legs in less than a 1.5-inch section. In the sketch the leg tapers from 1-1/4" (largest) to 5/8" at the foot. I am sure his detail is the same.

Thanks for this. However, the bottom part is unobstructed. I'm sure it would be straightforward to shape the bottom, with planes/spokeshaves and some patience. It's the transition from the bevel to the top face of the leg that's tricky. That piece appears to be flat in the area where the drawer is. It's not difficult to find a method to work the area where the bevel meets to top part, if the top part is flat. It's trickier when the top face is rounded. I think Derek has the right idea, but it's going to take careful work to get it clean and smooth.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
Reply
#16
  Re: How would you handle this? by Aram (Take a look at this ...)
Aram,

Marc Spagnuolo has a Krenov-inspired cabinet in the Wood Whisperer Guild.  You buy the project a la carte, so $80 gets you ~ 3 hours of the project build and plans plus some other perks if you're interested.

Wood Whisperer Guild Krenov Cabinet
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