Plane restoring process
#11
  
It has been a while since I posted some of this so I thought I would post some pictures

The first one is grinding the side from the bottom I need a good true surface and machining processes dictate locating off from the largest surface.

   

Next up is grinding the other side parallel in the free state. Helps to eliminate any stress or twists that may have been in since production.

   

Indicating the bottom in using two precision vises so that the least amount needs to be taken off.Because of the way the precision vise works the sides needed to be ground first so the clamping force will not distort the bottom. If there is a possibility of a twist or distortion when clamped it will spring back when unclamped.

   

   

The next picture shows the bottom after .005 has been removed. This is why I say one can't lap a plane flat. It will rock and one has to all the metal in the middle so the closer one get to being done the more that needs to be removed.

   

The next picture is just dressing the wheel ( sharpening, truing, and removing any metal particles. Note the bottom is finished but the metal will stil warm up in the middle so a final coupe of passes at .0004 per pass elinaiates that, followed off with 2 spark out passes.

   

What isn't shown the the sides get reground so there are no marks. taping the bottom around during indicating leaves minor scratches when it was moved around during clamping.

And final inspection and the CMM gauge ( for a lack of a better thing to call it)  is CNC programmable

   

So next time you see one of my planes that I have for sale maybe you can understand all the work that went into it for the price. And why the higher price

Thanks for looking,

Tom
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#12
  Re: Plane restoring process by tablesawtom (It has been a while ...)
I really like when you post threads like this, Tom.

Thanks for the insight!
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#13
Video    Re: Plane restoring process by tablesawtom (It has been a while ...)
Tom just did a Stanley No. 5 1/2 Plane for me and I have to say the results were better than the pictures show. This is the second plane I have that Tom has ground. Do your self a favor and send him your planes, the results are well worth it.
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#14
  Re: Plane restoring process by tablesawtom (It has been a while ...)
Used to do that in the Air Force and it is a job that takes time.  Usually you set it and take a coffee break for 15 minutes or do something else.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#15
  Re: RE: Plane restoring process by Arlin Eastman (Used to do that in t...)
(02-01-2020, 11:31 AM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Used to do that in the Air Force and it is a job that takes time.  Usually you set it and take a coffee break for 15 minutes or do something else.

No automatic down feed, grinder is strictly manual, can set the cross feed to reverse.

Tom
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#16
  Re: Plane restoring process by tablesawtom (It has been a while ...)
Still wondering...just how many of these old planes actually NEED this done to them..... Confused
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#17
  Re: RE: Plane restoring process by bandit571 (Still wondering...ju...)
(02-01-2020, 12:00 PM)bandit571 Wrote: Still wondering...just how many of these old planes actually NEED this done to them..... Confused

Well, if I had a surface grinder and the knowhow to use it, I would not have tossed a dozen or two significantly pitted bodies over the last 25 years.  Then there are those that are warped from birth, but I don't buy such planes.  But generally, I sharpen up and adjust and put a plane to wood before I even consider lapping it, and if it works, then its good to me.  One can screw up a sole trying to "flatten" it if you don't know what you are doing.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#18
  Re: RE: Plane restoring process by bandit571 (Still wondering...ju...)
(02-01-2020, 12:00 PM)bandit571 Wrote: Still wondering...just how many of these old planes actually NEED this done to them..... Confused

.............................
I have an old Stanley catalog showing a production line picture of a factory worker flattening the sole and sides of a #7 or #8 on a wide belt grinder by holding the plane with his hands. How flat could it be??? Crazy Big Grin
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in Navy Times, November 1994]


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#19
  Re: RE: Plane restoring process by Timberwolf ([quote='bandit571' p...)
(02-01-2020, 12:24 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: .............................
I have an old Stanley catalog showing a production line picture of a factory worker flattening the sole and sides of a  #7 or #8 on a wide belt grinder by holding the plane with his hands. How flat could it be??? Crazy  Big Grin

As flat as it NEEDED to be....
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#20
  Re: RE: Plane restoring process by Timberwolf ([quote='bandit571' p...)
(02-01-2020, 12:24 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: .............................
I have an old Stanley catalog showing a production line picture of a factory worker flattening the sole and sides of a  #7 or #8 on a wide belt grinder by holding the plane with his hands. How flat could it be??? Crazy  Big Grin

The planes were milled flat first  and the mill marks removed with the sander And the belt sander shown was special made for just that process and it is a fact not all operators are equal. And one hoped he didn't get one that was sanded early Monday morning or late Friday afternoon.  And yes from experience usually they are high in the middle.  So they rocked. and depending on the fixturing it a person was going to get chatter in the cut, it will be in the beginning or ending of the cut where there is less support.  So a little more pressure could be applied at the ends. It is a process that is no longer practiced today. I am not for sure but if you have a type 11 it is probably over 100 years old

 Do most planes need to be ground? NO And if they do not need to be ground then why does every one think that they need to flatten them in the first place?  Why does't anyone question that?

Whether or not one thinks it need t be done is a matter of personal choice. One man's trash is another man' s treasure.

Tom
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