What finish for a platter?
#11
  
Made my first platter today. What finish do you all recommend? It is maple wood with a few small wormholes.
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#12
  Re: What finish for a platter? by MidwestMan (Made my first platte...)
(02-05-2020, 01:18 AM)MidwestMan Wrote: Made my first platter today. What finish do you all recommend? It is maple wood with a few small wormholes.

you could use butcher block oil, i'd guess it depends what your going to use it for.   jerry
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#13
  Re: What finish for a platter? by MidwestMan (Made my first platte...)
On the lathe, my go-to finish is wipe-on poly for a durable finish. 

If the piece is going to see heavy food service, I soak it mineral oil for 4 to 6 hours.
"I tried being reasonable..........I didn't like it." Clint Eastwood
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#14
  Re: What finish for a platter? by MidwestMan (Made my first platte...)
Food service = mineral oil
Wall hanger or shelf sitter = lacquer
Carrying things = wipe-on poly or spar varnish
We do segmented turning, not because it is easy, but because it is hard.
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#15
  Re: What finish for a platter? by MidwestMan (Made my first platte...)
(02-05-2020, 01:18 AM)MidwestMan Wrote: Made my first platter today. What finish do you all recommend? It is maple wood with a few small wormholes.
Worm holes imply it won't be used for wet food.  For dry (solid) use, I'd go poly, dilute or full strength.  Mineral oil is a treatment, not a finish, so no need.  The minwax wipe-on seems to amber less than other oil-based alkyd varnishes.   I don't use water-based because they don't penetrate well.

Wet use, with holes blocked would get a curing oil like walnut, or wipe-on wipe off dilute,  so it will shed moisture but not shine.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#16
  Re: RE: What finish for a platter? by MichaelMouse ([quote='MidwestMan' ...)
(02-05-2020, 09:54 AM)SceneryMaker Wrote: Food service = mineral oil
Wall hanger or shelf sitter = lacquer
Carrying things = wipe-on poly or spar varnish

Yes

(02-05-2020, 12:23 PM)MichaelMouse Wrote: Worm holes imply it won't be used for wet food.  For dry (solid) use, I'd go poly, dilute or full strength.  Mineral oil is a treatment, not a finish, so no need.  The minwax wipe-on seems to amber less than other oil-based alkyd varnishes.   I don't use water-based because they don't penetrate well.

Wet use, with holes blocked would get a curing oil like walnut, or wipe-on wipe off dilute,  so it will shed moisture but not shine.

 Or
Steve





 
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#17
  Re: What finish for a platter? by MidwestMan (Made my first platte...)
Thanks guys, for the input. I'm not sure what I will actually use it for. Probably dry foods. Like small sandwich items or the like. At first I thought to use Mahoney's walnut oil.

 I think now, I'll go with a wipe-on poly. I suppose the problem is, I don't know what I intend to do with this platter. I'll probably use it very rarely. Which is why I feel lost with what actually to do, and why I asked you guys to pass on your thoughts.

Thanks again.
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#18
  Re: RE: What finish for a platter? by MidwestMan (Thanks guys, for the...)
(02-05-2020, 10:29 PM)MidwestMan Wrote: Thanks guys, for the input. I'm not sure what I will actually use it for. Probably dry foods. Like small sandwich items or the like. At first I thought to use Mahoney's walnut oil.

 I think now, I'll go with a wipe-on poly. I suppose the problem is, I don't know what I intend to do with this platter. I'll probably use it very rarely. Which is why I feel lost with what actually to do, and why I asked you guys to pass on your thoughts.

Thanks again.

You could always use shellac a couple wash coats to close grain and French polish the two sides for show and will wear Ok sitting around if the finish needs to be stronger go right over it with the wipe on poly the shellac will pop the grain and poly will be more durable than the shellac alone.
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#19
  Re: RE: What finish for a platter? by Tim J. Chase ([quote='MidwestMan' ...)
Tim J. Chase
You could always use shellac a couple wash coats to close grain and French polish the two sides for show and will wear Ok sitting around if the finish needs to be stronger go right over it with the wipe on poly the shellac will pop the grain and poly will be more durable than the shellac alone.

That's a good idea Tim. I know what I would like to use this big platter for, but I don't think it would be smart. I'd like to take my pizza out of the oven and slap it on this platter. Then sit down in front of the tv and enjoy. What finish could take the heat and not chemically be induced in my food? Yea yea... I'm a bachelor ...  Smile'
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#20
  Re: What finish for a platter? by MidwestMan (Made my first platte...)
  • couple quick shellac coats 
  • fill wormholes with epoxy 
  • fill any endgrain
  • 6 coats of full-strength polyurethane over everything 
  • wait a few weeks, buff the daylights out of it

Shellac so the epoxy doesn't make dark spots on the surrounding area. Epoxy because wormholes and any kind of food don't mix. End-grain-filled, buffed-out thick poly because you want to be able to clean it a few times with ease.
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