Hand Tool Action
#5
  
Been working on a cherry buffet and have gotten quite a bit of hand tool action involved.

Tonight I had to pull out the small apron plane and the bull-nose plane to clean up the bottom of some base molding. 


That bull-nose plane was a Secret Santa gift many years ago and it really works well to clean up right to the corner of the flat edge. Very thankful to the Woodnetter that gifted it to me.   The apron plane was a $5 flea market find and it is in excellent shape.

   

The 1/4" beading plane was owned by one of the men who built the Brooklyn Bridge. He was my grandparents neighbor in Queens, NY. When he passed away, my grandfather got his entire tool set. All the tools had his name stamped in them; W. Dempsey. A few of the tools have trickled down to me including this beading plane. It still works perfectly and I plan to use it to create beads on the side corners of the cabinet and doors.
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#6
  Re: Hand Tool Action by Scoony (Been working on a ch...)
Cool intro! 

My kid has a couple stainless steel screws used to hold down the Ipe walk from that bridge. He was with a high school history class. We followed his progress down the seaboard with money wires and FedX payments to ship lost items to the next hotel. He traded all his camera film for junk food. 

I like that stubby smoother.
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#7
  Re: Hand Tool Action by Scoony (Been working on a ch...)
Interesting connection to the bridge! I too have a tool/bridge connection. My great-grandfather and my grandfather were carpenters in Maysville, KY and they worked on building the Simon Kenton bridge that spans the Ohio river at Maysville.

My grandfather transitioned from finish carpentry to woodworking in his later years, and he was quite good at it. He built me my first workbench, complete with a birds-mouth stop, when I was 5. I still have the bench in a corner of my shop, now 60 years later.

I got all their tools when my grandfather passed away over 25 years ago, and I’ve recently passed some of their tools to my grandkids which means they have been in the family for 6 generations. Many of these tools are now literally worn out, but they sure are special to use and bring a big grin to my face every time I put them to work.
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#8
  Re: RE: Hand Tool Action by Greg Jones (Interesting connecti...)
(02-28-2020, 01:38 PM)Greg Jones Wrote: I got all their tools when my grandfather passed away over 25 years ago, and I’ve recently passed some of their tools to my grandkids which means they have been in the family for 6 generations. Many of these tools are now literally worn out, but they sure are special to use and bring a big grin to my face every time I put them to work.


I inherited two trunks of my great-grandfather's tools, one of the trunks has the 1886 shipping label from the S.S. Thingvalla leaving Copenhagen. Unfortunately, there isn't much known about his history, I believe by the sheer size of most of the stuff, he was a barn builder, my dad thinks he remembers being told he was a ship builder in the old country. He technically wasn't my great grandfather, he was an "old bachelor" that my great grandmother became a "housekeeper" for after my great grandfather died during the depression.
Mark

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