Anyone know what this is?
#8
  
https://madison.craigslist.org/tls/d/roc...50048.html

Pedro
I miss nested quotes..........
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#9
  Re: Anyone know what this is? by PedroOhare (https://madison.crai...)
No clue.  Very interesting though.  Kind of looks like a metal mill to me.
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#10
  Re: Anyone know what this is? by PedroOhare (https://madison.crai...)
It had a wood table on the supports at one time. Looks like it has a cutter head of some sort.
Steve





 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020

 When I use the toilet it smells just like fresh brewed coffee!
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#11
  Re: Anyone know what this is? by PedroOhare (https://madison.crai...)
1890-1920 era Babbett bearing single end tenoner, or at least what's left of one.  it was a routine woodworking machine of the day.

edit- It was driven by leather belts from a line shaft. It still has the tenon heads, saw head, and the lower cope head.

The modern versions of industrial tenders had a separate electric motor for all five heads.

That particular specimen is missing the iron table and will probably end up at the recyclers. It probably weighs 1500 lbs and that's a little heavy for the apartment floors of hipsters.
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#12
  Re: RE: Anyone know what this is? by Bob Vaughan (1890-1920 era Babbet...)
(03-18-2020, 12:38 AM)Bob Vaughan Wrote: 1890-1920 era Babbett bearing single end tenoner, or at least what's left of one.  it was a routine woodworking machine of the day.

edit-  It was driven by leather belts from a line shaft.  It still has the tenon heads, saw head, and the lower cope head.

The modern versions of industrial tenders had a separate electric motor for all five heads.

That particular specimen is missing the iron table and will probably end up at the recyclers.  It probably weighs 1500 lbs and that's a little heavy for the apartment floors of hipsters.

Great description, I saw a similar machine that made tenons on fence rails . The line shaft was replaced with a small diesel engine. 
I was working down the road and went to the fence  supply for lunch since my girl friend worked in the office. This place was a warehouse of vintage machinery. The creek that ran a paddle wheel dried up when the state built a dam. Otherwise the line shaft may have still been working.
I remember the Sash Saw they had best since my grandfather ran it. I think you will have to look far and wide to find a Sash Saw today.
I made my own small scale Sash Saw and used it for years. When I retired I sold it. 
mike
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#13
  Re: Anyone know what this is? by PedroOhare (https://madison.crai...)
But wouldn't it be a nice fixture in the living room?   Uhoh
"There are no strangers- only friends I haven't met.
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#14
  Re: RE: Anyone know what this is? by mike4244 ([quote='Bob Vaughan'...)
That awkward strip of steel sticking out the back of the tenoner is actually the on-off button equivalent.  The line shaft was always turning so that long lever moved the line shaft belt from the idle pulley to the drive pulley.

Just for fun, I've included a few photos.

   
From the ad, annotated.

   
A modern full size tenoner.  Wadkin brand.  This gives a perspective of scale.  Those things are big.  I had this in my shop for a buyer that needed one.  It was way too big for me.

   

Look in the corner of this cluttered photo and you can see the pint-sized Millbury tenoner that I have and use.  It cuts the top and bottom of the board at the same time.  A tenon takes about 10 seconds once the machine is set up.  It takes longer for me to cut the tenon shoulders.
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