copper countertops
#6
  
This interesting article from Reuters says that of the hard surfaces that are available for countertops, copper is the most inhospitable surface, surpassing stainless steel and other hard surfaces.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-healt...SKBN2143QP

On plastic and stainless steel, viable virus could be detected after three days. On cardboard, the virus was not viable after 24 hours. On copper, it took 4 hours for the virus to become inactivated.

I further read  that only certain copper is certified for its antimicrobial action, this company touts there copper for that.

https://cuverro.com/products/copper-sheets-strips

As a leading copper sheet & strip supplier, CuVerro® enables manufacturers to provide their customers with highly-functional antimicrobial products. Any product made with stainless steel can be made with CuVerro®: sinks, hardware, push plates, and more. CuVerro® copper alloy is so strong and durable that it can be used anywhere cleanliness, health, and safety are important. And unlike stainless steel, CuVerro® destroys bacteria between routine cleanings.


So has anyone had countertops made from copper?

Addendum:

Here is a rather scholarly article on this same subject:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3067274/

Bacteria, yeasts, and viruses are rapidly killed on metallic copper surfaces, and the term “contact killing” has been coined for this process.
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#7
  Re: copper countertops by Cooler (This interesting art...)
I would not use copper as it will turn green and nasty over time and copper has a stink to it as well as gunk that you will be wiping off all the time. Also not the best metal for humans.

          Zinc is a more common choice for countertops.

 
          We have granite and if I had my way I would have a full commercial kitchen. Tiled up the walls, stainless tables and reach in coolers for counters. No countertop as the tables and the top of the reach in are stainless work surfaces. Then a commercial stove not the residential versions that cost 10x as much. Then you can move everything around and wash it all down into the drains in the floor.
       A kitchen is a work area it should not be covered in wood cabinetry like a study or Library.
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#8
  Re: RE: copper countertops by Robert Adams (I would not use copp...)
(03-18-2020, 01:03 PM)Robert Adams Wrote: I would not use copper as it will turn green and nasty over time and copper has a stink to it as well as gunk that you will be wiping off all the time. Also not the best metal for humans.

          Zinc is a more common choice for countertops.

 
          We have granite and if I had my way I would have a full commercial kitchen. Tiled up the walls, stainless tables and reach in coolers for counters. No countertop as the tables and the top of the reach in are stainless work surfaces. Then a commercial stove not the residential versions that cost 10x as much. Then you can move everything around and wash it all down into the drains in the floor.
       A kitchen is a work area it should not be covered in wood cabinetry like a study or Library.
They listed the top three anti-microbial surfaces as copper, then silver then zinc. 

There was a bar where I used to live that had a beautiful hammered copper bar top.  Of course the bar would get wiped down dozens of times a night.  A small amount of green patina in the corners, but elsewhere a nice (but not shiny) copper color. 

And yes, zinc apparently is more popular in Europe; but I have not come across it in the USA.  Of course you can solder the joints and not have a color shift.  Copper will not allow for that.
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#9
  Re: copper countertops by Cooler (This interesting art...)
I see they don't mention wood, such as chop blocks. Wood also rids itself of viruses.

 Did they mention that a mild bleached damp rag wiped across the counter kills the virus in seconds?

 I don't see anyone mentioning the UV lights. One could walk around with a portable one and wave it across surfaces. They've always claimed they kill viruses on exposure- has me wondering....

I wish someone would come up with an article that gives one all the detailed info instead of bits and pieces. But I guess a little is better than none.


Sometimes no matter how careful you are, you get it. On the last cruise we went on, I carried hand sanitizer in my pocket and used it constantly. I never touched my face and all that hoopla and still got the worst virus I ever had. Lost 30 lbs in 2 weeks.
Come to think about it, maybe getting a virus right now would be good for me- could stand to lose a few pounds.
"There are no strangers- only friends I haven't met.
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#10
  Re: RE: copper countertops by daddo (I see they don't men...)
(03-18-2020, 03:42 PM)daddo Wrote: I see they don't mention wood, such as chop blocks. Wood also rids itself of viruses.

 Did they mention that a mild bleached damp rag wiped across the counter kills the virus in seconds?

 I don't see anyone mentioning the UV lights. One could walk around with a portable one and wave it across surfaces. They've always claimed they kill viruses on exposure- has me wondering....

I wish someone would come up with an article that gives one all the detailed info instead of bits and pieces. But I guess a little is better than none.


Sometimes no matter how careful you are, you get it. On the last cruise we went on, I carried hand sanitizer in my pocket and used it constantly. I never touched my face and all that hoopla and still got the worst virus I ever had. Lost 30 lbs in 2 weeks.
Come to think about it, maybe getting a virus right now would be good for me- could stand to lose a few pounds.

UV does kill viruses.  They don't say how long the viruses have to be exposed to the UV however:

https://nymag.com/strategist/article/doe...lizer.html

John Boos says that their cutting boards are "antimicrobial" and kills bacteria, but no mention of virus or fungus.

https://www.johnboos.com/boos-block-anti...ngle-1.asp


I should note that the sawdust from maple wood can cause respiratory issues.

https://www.wood-database.com/hard-maple/

Allergies/Toxicity: Hard maple, along with other maples in the [i]Acer genus have been reported to cause skin irritation, runny nose, and asthma-like respiratory effects. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.[/i]
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