Rip treated lumber?
#11
Looking for something that doesn't seem to exist - treated 1x3. If I rip a treated 1x6 will I compromise the treating?
Mike

I work on the 50-50-90 rule: If there's a 50-50 choice, I'll pick the wrong one 90% of the time!
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#12
My understanding is that the pressure treatment does not penetrate evenly all the way through. So, yes, by ripping the 2x6s, you will expose the center where the treatment is less concentrated. This may or may not be of concern, depending on how you are using it. If you buy lumber that is treated for ground contact, it will be less of a problem. I may be miss-remembering but, I think I read that you can get lumber that has been treated either under greater pressure or for a longer period so that the treatment penetrates more completely. Someone, please correct me if I'm wrong. Lacking that, you can ask your local lumber dealer.
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#13
I think you'll be OK. Treated lumber is usually done under pressure to force the solution through the whole piece of wood. Can't speak to 6x6, but 1x6 should be fine.
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#14
It depends on how it's treated. If it's pressure treated, you should be fine. If it's "dipped", you might not be fine. Dipped 1x3s are usually fence boards so not "pressure" treated. Just treated. But you should be able to tell by the stamp or tag and look it up.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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#15
Thanks. Everything I'm looking at is pressure treated, and rated for ground contact. This will not be in contact with the ground, I'll be using them as the upper and lower rails on the porch railing. So, by what has been said thus far, seems like I will be good to go.

This is an appearance thing, the posts are nominal 4x4, and the balusters are nominal 2x2. I thought a 1x3 would look better than a 1x4.
Mike

I work on the 50-50-90 rule: If there's a 50-50 choice, I'll pick the wrong one 90% of the time!
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#16
I don't think I have ever seen pressure treated 1X material.  The preservative on PT 2X material I have seen doesn't penetrate all the way to the center.  The difference in color is obvious on a cut end.  Pressure treated 3/4" plywood is the same color throughout so I assume the treatment penetrates to the center.  That may or may not apply to solid stock.  Buy a PT 1X6 and cut it to see if the preservative goes all the way to the center.  You could also apply wood preservative to the cut edge for a bit of additional protection.  My guess is the center of 1X material would not be as rot resistant as the exterior surface that has received direct treatment.
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#17
I haven't seen treated lumber worth buying in years. You can rip it down if you want then coat the cut side with the green pressure treat stuff IF you have a Menards as Depot and Lowes don't carry it.
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#18
Ripping a 1x6 down the middle, be prepared to possibly have 2 wagon bows when you get done.
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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#19
(03-29-2020, 05:35 PM)Scouter Wrote: Thanks. Everything I'm looking at is pressure treated, and rated for ground contact. This will not be in contact with the ground, I'll be using them as the upper and lower rails on the porch railing. So, by what has been said thus far, seems like I will be good to go.

This is an appearance thing, the posts are nominal 4x4, and the balusters are nominal 2x2. I thought a 1x3 would look better than a 1x4.

You'll probably have to special order something that thin rated for ground contact. There will be a minimum.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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#20
(03-29-2020, 04:04 PM)Scouter Wrote: Looking for something that doesn't seem to exist - treated 1x3. If I rip a treated 1x6 will I compromise the treating?

Go ahead and rip the 1x6, I've ripped pressure treated often, mainly for fence pickets . 
mike
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