Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions
#11
  
We had a new heating system installed 2 years ago. A the time I pass on getting the UV lamp in the filter that was supposed to be anti-bacterial. However, with the Covid situation and my wife being high risk, I'm second guessing my choice. I can have the lamp installed now, but I seem to recall this question being asked some years ago and the general experience was that this were very unreliable (?) function-wise. Anyone have info they can share about whether these things are worthwhile? I'm getting the furnace back out anyway to fit a humidifier (another mistake I made) and could do the light while they're here.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#12
  Re: Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions by fredhargis (We had a new heating...)
I don’t have any facts to back this up, but I’ve never been convinced that UV shining on a fast moving stream of air will give the microbes/virus enough ‘soak’ time to disrupt their DNA/RNA, which is what UV-C used for this purpose does.

Shining it in a room for some period of time is how some hospital rooms are sanitized, but it’s both high intensity, and for some duration longer than a few milliseconds.  

Unless the furnace is shining it on the filter, but if microbes are stuck on the filter already, I’m not clear on how it’s beneficial.

There is a system, or research at least, that shining far UV-C on open spaces like shopping malls will do the same thing, and far UV-C is supposedly not harmful to people since the wavelength is too short to penetrate the outer dead layer of skin, or the various layers of eyeballs.  But I don’t know that, and I don’t think anyone sells such bulbs to the general public at this time.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-21058-w
Tom

“This place smells like that odd combo of flop sweat, hopelessness, aaaand feet.”







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#13
  Re: Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions by fredhargis (We had a new heating...)
If your wife is high risk, you're much better served keeping everyone away from her, meaning no visitors to the house, including the guy that would install the lamp of questionable value.

Both of you just need to stay away from people, to the degree possible.

And take your vitamins with D.

And sit outside in the sun.

Drink lots of water.
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#14
  Re: Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions by fredhargis (We had a new heating...)
(04-18-2020, 06:45 AM)fredhargis Wrote: We had a new heating system installed 2 years ago. A the time I pass on getting the UV lamp in the filter that was supposed to be anti-bacterial. However, with the Covid situation and my wife being high risk, I'm second guessing my choice. I can have the lamp installed now, but I seem to recall this question being asked some years ago and the general experience was that this were very unreliable (?) function-wise. Anyone have info they can share about whether these things are worthwhile? I'm getting the furnace back out anyway to fit a humidifier (another mistake I made) and could do the light while they're here.

If your air handler will support it use pleated MERV 12 or 13 filters at the air handler.
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#15
  Re: Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions by fredhargis (We had a new heating...)
No conventional filter for home use will help with trapping a virus.

So don't run out to the store to buy a better filter. That would make you the possible vector.
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#16
  Re: RE: Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions by Phil Thien (No conventional filt...)
(04-18-2020, 09:41 AM)Phil Thien Wrote: No conventional filter for home use will help with trapping a virus.

So don't run out to the store to buy a better filter. That would make you the possible vector.

I should of said MERV 13 or better which are not conventional home filters. A 4" MERV 13 or better pleated box filter at the air handler can stop some air born virus and bacteria. Have to make sure the air handler can handle the additional pressure drop across the filter.
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#17
  Re: RE: Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions by bottd ([quote='Phil Thien' ...)
(04-18-2020, 11:26 AM)bottd Wrote: I should of said MERV 13 or better which are not conventional home filters. A 4" MERV 13 or better pleated box filter at the air handler can stop some air born virus and bacteria. Have to make sure the air handler can handle the additional pressure drop across the filter.

I suppose.

I think the OP is better-off avoiding rocking of the boat at this point, because the risk of someone entering the house to fix/adjust something and bringing the virus with them, is greater than avoiding people and maintaining the status quo.

All IMHO.
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#18
  Re: Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions by fredhargis (We had a new heating...)
(04-18-2020, 07:52 AM)TDKPE Wrote: I don’t have any facts to back this up, but I’ve never been convinced that UV shining on a fast moving stream of air will give the microbes/virus enough ‘soak’ time to disrupt their DNA/RNA, which is what UV-C used for this purpose does.
 That's more or less what I was thinking, hence my question. Doesn't seem like they would do much.
(04-18-2020, 09:33 AM)bottd Wrote: If your air handler will support it use pleated MERV 12 or 13 filters at the air handler.

We have that already, and I'm doubtful it does much to help with air borne bacteria.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#19
  Re: Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions by fredhargis (We had a new heating...)
They work.  Sorta, kinda, mostly, sometimes.  Effectiveness is determined by numerous factors.  They have a high maintenance cost and limited effectiveness on some pathogens.  Unfortunately, this virus appears to be relatively immune to readily available residential scale systems.  They are helpful in reducing some exposures but I would not recommend one without knowing a great deal more about your circumstances and what you have for equipment.  Yes, I have installed them and had measureable positive results but ........
Blackhat
Common decency is as rare as common sense. I figure there was only a finite amount of both made and its getting shared out among too many folks.


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#20
  Re: Anti-bacterial UV furnace lamp opinions by fredhargis (We had a new heating...)
We have just a straight UV light I bought off of Amazon a couple of years ago.  My wife thinks it has cut down on mold/fungus/whatever (I didn't realize we had a problem. Smirk )

A fried who manages an HVAC company showed me what they are installing...besides the UV, it also ionizes the air - so all kinds of magic stuff.  I think he said the LED unit is $400 (or was it $495?) plus installation (which he said is do-able, but you need to wire it to the board as it goes on and off with the blower - maybe need some kind of relay as well???) or $300ish for the non-LED one which he said is also easier to install as it just stays on.

https://www.rgf.com/products/air/halo-le...-purifier/

and

https://www.rgf.com/products/air/reme-halo/

Go to the video tab on that second link and watch the "commercial" applications video.  They claim reduced absenteeism when used in schools, reduces MRSA in hospitals, and kills 98% of sneeze germs within 3'.  Sounds intriguing.

This is not an endorsement from me...but it we were high risk, I'd certainly consider it for not all that much money (when you are talking health care related...).  I'm just passing on what a friend shared.
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