Minwax penetrating stains
#8
  
I just looked at the Minwax site and they are saying that the penetrating stains have been reformulated to dry in two hours. 

Has anyone tried this?  When was this change made? 

It is now 250 VOC compliant, which I suppose was the driving motivation for the change.

https://www.minwax.com/wood-products/sta...ood-finish



Minwax® Wood Finish™ is a penetrating oil-based wood stain, which provides beautiful rich color that enhances the natural wood grain. Our innovative new formula delivers the same premium oil-rich color as before, but in a single coat that dries in just two hours. Start your project today and finish today with new faster dry time.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#9
  Re: Minwax penetrating stains by Cooler (I just looked at the...)
I haven't used any new cans in several years. I still have lots of older stain.
I like the fact that it dries apparently in 2 now, instead of overnight.
Steve





 
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#10
  Re: Minwax penetrating stains by Cooler (I just looked at the...)
(06-09-2020, 08:49 AM)Cooler Wrote: I just looked at the Minwax site and they are saying that the penetrating stains have been reformulated to dry in two hours. 

Has anyone tried this?  When was this change made? 

It is now 250 VOC compliant, which I suppose was the driving motivation for the change.

https://www.minwax.com/wood-products/sta...ood-finish



Minwax® Wood Finish™ is a penetrating oil-based wood stain, which provides beautiful rich color that enhances the natural wood grain. Our innovative new formula delivers the same premium oil-rich color as before, but in a single coat that dries in just two hours. Start your project today and finish today with new faster dry time.

It looks like they took out the mineral spirits and replaced it with lighter hydrocarbons.  Whatever they chose must not be counted as much towards VOC's because the datasheet shows it still contains  more than 60% solvent.  

If you want to try a very impressive fast dry solvent based stain try SW's BAC Wiping Stains.  Beautiful deep color in one application, easy to use, and ready to spray topcoat in 2 hours.  There are a bunch of stock colors and SW's will custom tint them further to any color you want, for free.  At around $25/qt it's a bargain.  

John
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#11
  Re: RE: Minwax penetrating stains by jteneyck ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(06-09-2020, 03:52 PM)jteneyck Wrote: It looks like they took out the mineral spirits and replaced it with lighter hydrocarbons.  Whatever they chose must not be counted as much towards VOC's because the datasheet shows it still contains  more than 60% solvent.  

If you want to try a very impressive fast dry solvent based stain try SW's BAC Wiping Stains.  Beautiful deep color in one application, easy to use, and ready to spray topcoat in 2 hours.  There are a bunch of stock colors and SW's will custom tint them further to any color you want, for free.  At around $25/qt it's a bargain.  

John

I kind of soured on wiping stains because of what I saw at Barnes & Noble.  All their fixtures were wood and a rich brown color.  But normal wear revealed a very light color wood underneath. 

A penetrating stain would have lost the surface sealer but would have remained dark and the wear would be hardly noticeable. 

When I had to match a color a while back, I started by applying a penetrating stain and then adding a wiping stain to match the final color.  That way if the wiping stain is ever abraded off, the dark color of the penetrating stain will remain.

I do use wiping stain on pine to avoid blotching though.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#12
  Re: RE: Minwax penetrating stains by Cooler ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(06-10-2020, 10:29 AM)Cooler Wrote: I kind of soured on wiping stains because of what I saw at Barnes & Noble.  All their fixtures were wood and a rich brown color.  But normal wear revealed a very light color wood underneath. 

A penetrating stain would have lost the surface sealer but would have remained dark and the wear would be hardly noticeable. 

When I had to match a color a while back, I started by applying a penetrating stain and then adding a wiping stain to match the final color.  That way if the wiping stain is ever abraded off, the dark color of the penetrating stain will remain.

I do use wiping stain on pine to avoid blotching though.

Maybe we're talking symantics here but almost all wiping stains have a penetrating component.   Even gel stains have some penetrating behavior, as evidence of the stain they leave behind if you apply it to raw wood and try to wipe it all off.  Anyway, SW's BAC Wiping Stain has both dyes and pigments in it.  It's in a different class of stains than I had ever used prior to trying them and it quickly became a favorite.  


But don't fool yourself that dyes penetrate very deep into the wood.  Once errant swipe with your sanding block will cut right through it.  I've learned that lesson several times, and the same will happen if the finished piece gets used hard.  If you want to avoid the underlying color of the wood to show even when the finish gets abraded off it's best to start with wood that has the color you want.  

John
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#13
  Re: Minwax penetrating stains by Cooler (I just looked at the...)
I think Minwax is smart for going to a faster drying stain. Much of their penetrating stain product is used on new construction. I’d guess 75% of the houses built in my area had the floors and cabinets stained with OB Minwax for many decades. Walk into a basement with the left over finishing products and a can of Minwax was typically found.

When I finished cabinets with OB Minwax, waiting at least 2 days for it to dry was a time killer. If you didn’t wait long enough, your lacquer would blush on you and that was a pain to repair. I’m surprised they didn’t reconfigure the formula for faster drying sooner. I can’t remember the last time I bought OB Minwax stain but it would be very low on my list of candidates to add color to any wood today. The smell is nauseating.


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#14
  Re: RE: Minwax penetrating stains by Cooler ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(06-10-2020, 10:29 AM)Cooler Wrote: I kind of soured on wiping stains because of what I saw at Barnes & Noble.  All their fixtures were wood and a rich brown color.  But normal wear revealed a very light color wood underneath. 
A lot of commercial furniture has what is called a toner -- a finish that contains color.  A couple of quick coats and a few minutes drying and it's off to the shipping room.  But like you said, when the finish wears (or is scuffed, etc.) the color goes with it.
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