Thread for tools that look gimicky but work!
#11
  
Recently built a prototype door to start replacing all the interior doors at home. Started with a pantry door that was also going to be the most custom sized because the pantry was framed a bit wonky.

Anyway, 3-panel Shaker where the upper panel is largest extending from the top rail to the lockrail. Poplar so not terribly heavy but definately heavier than the el-cheapo builder-grade hollow core doors that are present now.

I've always hated hanging doors because you either need somebody to help steady it as you engage the hinges or have to use a cat's paw bar and pencil or dowel as a lever and fulcrum. Works but can be a bit fussy. 

On a whim bought one of these for $18 and wonder of wonders, it worked great.
   

Because it is wider than the cat's paw and the rubber isn't slick, it doesn't let the door bobble around as it rises up. Just pump slowly with your foot while you ready the top hinge pin and work your way down the door.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#12
  Re: Thread for tools that look gimicky but work! by Rob Young (Recently built a pro...)
(06-17-2020, 10:20 AM)Rob Young Wrote: Recently built a prototype door to start replacing all the interior doors at home. Started with a pantry door that was also going to be the most custom sized because the pantry was framed a bit wonky.

Anyway, 3-panel Shaker where the upper panel is largest extending from the top rail to the lockrail. Poplar so not terribly heavy but definately heavier than the el-cheapo builder-grade hollow core doors that are present now.

I've always hated hanging doors because you either need somebody to help steady it as you engage the hinges or have to use a cat's paw bar and pencil or dowel as a lever and fulcrum. Works but can be a bit fussy. 

On a whim bought one of these for $18 and wonder of wonders, it worked great.


Because it is wider than the cat's paw and the rubber isn't slick, it doesn't let the door bobble around as it rises up. Just pump slowly with your foot while you ready the top hinge pin and work your way down the door.

Oh great! NOW you post this----after I no longer need to hang doors!!!!! Always used a flat, curved pry bar----never really was much easier.




Reply
#13
  Re: Thread for tools that look gimicky but work! by Rob Young (Recently built a pro...)
(06-17-2020, 10:20 AM)Rob Young Wrote: Recently built a prototype door to start replacing all the interior doors at home. Started with a pantry door that was also going to be the most custom sized because the pantry was framed a bit wonky.

Anyway, 3-panel Shaker where the upper panel is largest extending from the top rail to the lockrail. Poplar so not terribly heavy but definately heavier than the el-cheapo builder-grade hollow core doors that are present now.

I've always hated hanging doors because you either need somebody to help steady it as you engage the hinges or have to use a cat's paw bar and pencil or dowel as a lever and fulcrum. Works but can be a bit fussy. 

On a whim bought one of these for $18 and wonder of wonders, it worked great.


Because it is wider than the cat's paw and the rubber isn't slick, it doesn't let the door bobble around as it rises up. Just pump slowly with your foot while you ready the top hinge pin and work your way down the door.

Those bags are also used by car thieves.  They slip it in between the door jamb and it can spread the door enough to use a wire to unlock the car.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEMzTDiXC6A
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#14
  Re: Thread for tools that look gimicky but work! by Rob Young (Recently built a pro...)
(06-17-2020, 11:38 AM)Cooler Wrote: Those bags are also used by car thieves.  They slip it in between the door jamb and it can spread the door enough to use a wire to unlock the car.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEMzTDiXC6A

Last summer, I watched an AAA service call guy open a locked-out Chevy Avalanche with one of these in about 45 seconds, and he wasn't even particularly rushed when he did it.
Reply
#15
  Re: RE: Thread for tools that look gimicky but work! by Cooler ([quote='Rob Young' p...)
(06-17-2020, 11:38 AM)Cooler Wrote: Those bags are also used by car thieves.  They slip it in between the door jamb and it can spread the door enough to use a wire to unlock the car.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEMzTDiXC6A

Multitasker.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#16
  Re: Thread for tools that look gimicky but work! by Rob Young (Recently built a pro...)
Looks pretty slick Rob. If I was still hanging doors......

I did like Mac did, a curved flat pry bar.
Steve





 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020

 When I use the toilet it smells just like fresh brewed coffee!
fredp 02/13/2020







Reply
#17
  Re: Thread for tools that look gimicky but work! by Rob Young (Recently built a pro...)
In the spirit of the original post here, I bought one of the Veritas miniature shoulder planes years ago when I bought a medium shoulder plane.  It was less than $30, if I recall, and I bought it on a whim because I thought it was cool because it was tiny.

   

It has been amazingly useful, and I used it just yesterday while fitting some lids to small boxes.
Reply
#18
  Re: RE: Thread for tools that look gimicky but work! by Stwood_ (Looks pretty slick R...)
(06-17-2020, 11:54 AM)Stwood_ Wrote: Looks pretty slick Rob. If I was still hanging doors......

I did like Mac did, a curved flat pry bar.

Yep, that's what I used too. But I've always found it a bit wobbly and maybe my cat's paw doesn't have enough bend in it because I would slip a pencil under it to give it more lifting range. 

This gimick is about 6" wide and a bit grippy so it just felt more stable. Another suggested use by the manufacturer is to have two of them (gee, maybe they want to sell more) and use one for vertical and one for horizontal when shimming a window into place.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#19
  Re: Thread for tools that look gimicky but work! by Rob Young (Recently built a pro...)
Great to hear about the "novelty" shoulder plane being actually useful; bonus! The air shim has found itself useful in my shop for many things. It has a spot in a drawer and I know right where it is when I want it. A pry bar requires a hand; the air shim is a third hand. I can't really think of any other novelty tools that became useful . . . I have really drawn on the experiences of the forums and been pretty lucky in my choices. There's gotta be something. How about tools that I thought would be useful in building furniture but, just weren't . . . miter saw, biscuit joiner, PC314 circ-saw, brad nailers . . . there's probably more.
It’s amazing how hearing from someone with a different point of view reveals your blind spots.

Reply
#20
  Re: Thread for tools that look gimicky but work! by Rob Young (Recently built a pro...)
And since I'm on the door topic, here's another one. About $21 local to me for the kit without the corner punch (I think I bought the #200 kit, picture is the #300 kit). Has a bunch of templates for hinges and strike plates. Again, since the doors I'm replacing are inexpensive builder-grade pre-hung doors these templates are a dead on match for the existing hinge and strike mortises.

And it was a dead match to the replacement hinges I bought, swapping out as I go from brass to dull-rub bronze.

Milescraft Hingemate (200 or 300)
   

The router bit isn't bad either. Chucked up in a PC690 it did a clean job. 

Yes, this will leave two screw holes in your door or jamb where it was fixed down. But I'm just doing doors right now and all are going to be painted so no big deal. 

And if I was going to be making a living at this, I'd consider a different jig, one that is a bit more substantial and adjustable. This one is pretty much just for 1-3/8" (nominal) and 1-3/4" (nominal) doors. 

Could I build a hinge mortising jig? Yes, absolutely. But happy I splurged and got this and it will just live in a $5 tool bag from Harbor Freight (one of their hidden jems, good for organizing tools with lots of accessory parts that you want to have portable).
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.