Couple melamine questions
#8
  
I bought a sheet of melamine covered something (not sure what the substrate is) to use as an assembly table top.

This stuff

Couple questions, as I am new to this stuff. One, to attach the legs, can I screw into it, or will the screws not hold? What is the best fastening method? Two, what kind of stuff do I use as edging, and how do I attach it? Can I use wood, and if so, what kind of glue?

Thanks all.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#9
  Re: Couple melamine questions by Aram (I bought a sheet of ...)
I would drill out holes for inserts, use some epoxy when installing the inserts, and then use screws to attach the legs. (The screws fastening into the inserts.) You don't want the screws to attach too closely to the edge of the board - overtightening fasteners will cause the board to split.

Here's a couple of good links on to how to fasten melamine. Both say it's OK to use screws. I prefer something more robust, given you only have about 5/8" of fastener that will penetrate into the melamine.
https://www.familyhandyman.com/list/how-...-melamine/
https://www.hunker.com/12425728/melamine-screw-tips

What is the application for the melamine? An outfeed table? Furniture?
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#10
  Re: Couple melamine questions by Aram (I bought a sheet of ...)
The particle board core is better suited to being attached to something versus attaching something to it.  That is, the connection should be something like a Confirmat format screw seated in the particle board and extending through it into the adjacent material.

That being said, I have had success with MDF using a quality straight shank screw with an appropriate pilot hole.  You will find a lot of articles that address how to prepare to seat a screw in particle board or MDF; the pilot hole should match or exceed the shaft allowing only the threads to cut in.  The pilot is also a bit deeper than the screw sill go to avoid bottoming out and causing a wedge action that can split the material.
It’s amazing how hearing from someone with a different point of view reveals your blind spots.

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#11
  Re: Couple melamine questions by Aram (I bought a sheet of ...)
If you build a proper table base under it, meaning legs with stretchers between them, you can attach the top to it with table top fasteners, etc. w/o worry.  If you try to use the Melamine as a structural element by attaching the legs directly to it you likely will be disappointed, sooner or later.  

John
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#12
  Re: Couple melamine questions by Aram (I bought a sheet of ...)
I find this stuff works well if you screw through it and into real wood. I strongly suggest that you do not screw legs directly to it, those legs will have to contend with lateral force in all directions and your screws will get loose or even pull out entirely. Make your skirt and legs from wood and only screw into the wood to connect the top and you will be fine

You can cut strips of wood for edging and use regular wood glue (Titebond). I prefer, though, to cut my edging thick, half inch or so, then glue and either screw it or use an air nailer. Use copious amounts of glue, the edges really soak it up
"Yes, of course duct tape works in a near-vacuum. Duct tape works anywhere. Duct tape is magic and should be worshiped." Andy Weir (in his book The Martian)
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#13
  Re: RE: Couple melamine questions by kdouglaslee (I find this stuff wo...)
(06-23-2020, 12:24 PM)AHill Wrote: I would drill out holes for inserts, use some epoxy when installing the inserts, and then use screws to attach the legs.  (The screws fastening into the inserts.)    You don't want the screws to attach too closely to the edge of the board - overtightening fasteners will cause the board to split.

Here's a couple of good links on to how to fasten melamine.  Both say it's OK to use screws.  I prefer something more robust, given you only have about 5/8" of fastener that will penetrate into the melamine.
https://www.familyhandyman.com/list/how-...-melamine/
https://www.hunker.com/12425728/melamine-screw-tips

What is the application for the melamine?  An outfeed table?  Furniture?

Thank you. This will be an assembly table.

(06-23-2020, 12:34 PM)GeeDub Wrote: The particle board core is better suited to being attached to something versus attaching something to it.  That is, the connection should be something like a Confirmat format screw seated in the particle board and extending through it into the adjacent material.

That being said, I have had success with MDF using a quality straight shank screw with an appropriate pilot hole.  You will find a lot of articles that address how to prepare to seat a screw in particle board or MDF; the pilot hole should match or exceed the shaft allowing only the threads to cut in.  The pilot is also a bit deeper than the screw sill go to avoid bottoming out and causing a wedge action that can split the material.

Thanks. This was my first choice, as I did particularly want to drill through the melamine. However...

(06-23-2020, 02:50 PM)jteneyck Wrote: If you build a proper table base under it, meaning legs with stretchers between them, you can attach the top to it with table top fasteners, etc. w/o worry.  If you try to use the Melamine as a structural element by attaching the legs directly to it you likely will be disappointed, sooner or later.  

John

(06-23-2020, 03:19 PM)kdouglaslee Wrote: I find this stuff works well if you screw through it and into real wood.  I strongly suggest that you do not screw legs directly to it, those legs will have to contend with lateral force in all directions and your screws will get loose or even pull out entirely.  Make your skirt and legs from wood and only screw into the wood to connect the top and you will be fine

You can cut strips of wood for edging and use regular wood glue (Titebond).  I prefer, though, to cut my edging thick, half inch or so, then glue and either screw it or use an air nailer.  Use copious amounts of glue, the edges really soak it up

... I don't have a strong reason for that, and screwing into the wood stretchers does seem to make sense, and obviously will be strong. I'm leaning that way.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#14
  Re: RE: Couple melamine questions by GeeDub (The particle board c...)
(06-23-2020, 12:34 PM)GeeDub Wrote: The particle board core is better suited to being attached to something versus attaching something to it.  That is, the connection should be something like a Confirmat format screw seated in the particle board and extending through it into the adjacent material.

That being said, I have had success with MDF using a quality straight shank screw with an appropriate pilot hole.  You will find a lot of articles that address how to prepare to seat a screw in particle board or MDF; the pilot hole should match or exceed the shaft allowing only the threads to cut in.  The pilot is also a bit deeper than the screw sill go to avoid bottoming out and causing a wedge action that can split the material.


+1
Steve





 
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