Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square
#16
  Re: Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square by nuk (Anyone here have exp...)
Check out this guys YouTube channel - "Finish Carpentry TV".  You'll have to go through to find them, but he has done a number of moulding install around bullnose corners and they look good.  Instead of a normal 45 which would leave a gap, or the bullnose to square corner just to accomodate the corner on the moulding, he uses a series of 22.5 degree sections of moulding to wrap the corner.
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#17
  Re: Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square by nuk (Anyone here have exp...)
I'd knock off the square corner and go full bullnose to the floor unless I was repainting everything. The butchery will be hidden by the new, taller baseboards. No need to re-touch the drywall at all. The baseboard won't care.

I'd then look for a baseboard that comes with a bullnose radiused corner detail. Sucks, but that is what I would do.

I also hate bullnose corners. I hate bullnose transitioning to square even more. But, when working on existing construction, you do what you have to.
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"The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government." -- Patrick Henry
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#18
  Re: RE: Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square by cams2705 (Check out this guys ...)
(06-29-2020, 11:11 AM)cams2705 Wrote: Check out this guys YouTube channel - "Finish Carpentry TV".  You'll have to go through to find them, but he has done a number of moulding install around bullnose corners and they look good.  Instead of a normal 45 which would leave a gap, or the bullnose to square corner just to accomodate the corner on the moulding, he uses a series of 22.5 degree sections of moulding to wrap the corner.

I'm familiar with the technique... I had to do a bunch of them at the last house. 

Maybe it was just that it was my first time doing baseboard trim... or that that older house, which had a lot of additions/expansions over the years, was exceptionally un-square (and yes, I realize houses in general are not especially square by furniture/cabinet standards)... but I didn't particularly enjoy the experience.  That was why I thought the bullnose to square transition pieces were pretty cool when I saw them in this house.  Interesting that everyone else seems to poo-poo them and thinks they're ugly.

That said... I think this time around, between finding out that there are actual jigs out there to make the measuring... well, actually *measuring*, and a lot less *guessing*, so fewer trips back-n-forth to the shop to the saw... and also having 'discovered' the wonder that is CA glue + accelerator for sticking stuff like this together... I could see it going a lot more smoothly. Knock on wood Wink
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#19
  Re: Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square by nuk (Anyone here have exp...)
(06-29-2020, 08:35 AM)Cooler Wrote: The baseboard trim was radiused to match the drywall. 

Didn't even know that was a thing. Found (at least) one YT video showing it... definitely looks easier/more straight forward than the dual miters, but TBH I'm not sure I like the look. Definitely something I'll file away for future consideration, though.
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#20
  Re: Drywall corner transition - bullnose to square by nuk (Anyone here have exp...)
Like others I;m not a fan of the rounded corners and I know people with newer houses here that would love to go back to square corners but since every house is textured here it's a total skimcoat of the entire house to fix it as well as doing the corners. (wall texture sucks for repairs and makes them near impossible)

          One method.... If you have the right base molding you can go to a trim supplier and get that same profile in a flexible urethany rubbery stuff and just wrap around the curve. It would be pricey but would look different
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