Grounding an antenna
#9
Question    
Could use a little help with this. Everything I see from the NEC and other websites shows a simple installation which, naturally, doesn't match my house.

The antenna and the grounding system are on two opposite sides of the house, which end-to-end is about 40' long. The roof is metal. Any idea how I can run the two grounding wires (from the mast and from the coax) over to the grounding rod?

Here is what I typically see as grounding instructions. My antenna is mounted to the chimney on the opposite side of the house.


Mike

I work on the 50-50-90 rule: If there's a 50-50 choice, I'll pick the wrong one 90% of the time!
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#10
  Re: Grounding an antenna by Scouter (Could use a little h...)
I'm no expert but, my logic tells me that you don't have to ground it to the same rod that grounds your house electrical system, if that is what you refer to. New grounding rods are available. Look into getting a new one and installing it at the most convenient location for the antenna ground.
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#11
  Re: Grounding an antenna by Scouter (Could use a little h...)
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Mark Singleton

Bene vivendo est optimum vindictae
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#12
  Re: RE: Grounding an antenna by Willyou (I'm no expert but, m...)
(07-11-2020, 10:27 AM)Willyou Wrote: I'm no expert but, my logic tells me that you don't have to ground it to the same rod that grounds your house electrical system, if that is what you refer to. New grounding rods are available. Look into getting a new one and installing it at the most convenient location for the antenna ground.

According to the NEC, one rod per house, if a second one is installed it must be connected to the original.



Quote:NEC 250.5 
Grounding and Bonding
 

Grounding and Bonding All grounding electrodes that are present at each building or structure served shall be bonded together to form the grounding electrode system. 
Mike

I work on the 50-50-90 rule: If there's a 50-50 choice, I'll pick the wrong one 90% of the time!
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#13
  Re: RE: Grounding an antenna by Scouter ([quote='Willyou' pid...)
(07-11-2020, 12:31 PM)Scouter Wrote: According to the NEC, one rod per house, if a second one is installed it must be connected to the original.

Think that applies to the electrical system.  You are not doing anything with that, just providing a way for your isolated antenna to carry a charge to ground.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#14
  Re: RE: Grounding an antenna by MichaelMouse ([quote='Scouter' pid...)
(07-11-2020, 03:56 PM)MichaelMouse Wrote: Think that applies to the electrical system.  You are not doing anything with that, just providing a way for your isolated antenna to carry a charge to ground.

The image didn't post, not sure why, but the image showed grounding an antenna where this was taken from, so it seems to include both electrical and antenna.
Mike

I work on the 50-50-90 rule: If there's a 50-50 choice, I'll pick the wrong one 90% of the time!
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#15
  Re: Grounding an antenna by Scouter (Could use a little h...)
When they install lighting rods they use a separate ground rods so they are not tied into the electric system.  Only 1 ground rod for the electric
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#16
  Re: Grounding an antenna by Scouter (Could use a little h...)
Why not just ground to your dust collection duct work?   Winkgrin Winkgrin 

Rick
Any government that robs Peter to pay Paul, can always count on the support of Paul!
MAGA!!
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