Rescuing & restoring an old Jack Plane
#7
  
I found this plane recently and since I don't have jack plane I snapped it up (for free) and put it back in service again after it had languished around for many many years. Not sure the exact maker and age, and I'm sure it's impossible to get too accurate, but maybe someone here can help zero in on it a little more.



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#8
  Re: Rescuing & restoring an old Jack Plane by paulmon (I found this plane r...)
Found this on the internet that might give you a few things to check to help identify the maker.

“What you have there is a Rockford R5. The Rockford Tool Co. was a sister
company to the H.C. Marsh Co. and both companies occupied the same building
in Rockford Illinois. Rockford made bench planes in sizes R3 through R8
including R4 1/2 and R5 1/2. They did not make an R1, R2 or R5 1/4 size
planes that I have been able to identify (yet?). All sizes were available in
smooth and corrugated bottoms. No block planes or specialty planes were made
and sold by Rockford.

The planes are characteristically marked with the R and plane size cast into
the base at the toe or heel, or in front of the rear tote behind the frog.
The only other markings were typically on the cutters which was stamped with
Rockford TMP Rockford Ill and the blade width for planes marketed and sold
under the Rockford Tool Co name. These planes are often found with cutters
simply stamped Lakeside in script text which are also correct for the
planes. Apparently Montgomery Ward was a big customer for Rockford because
most of the planes you find will have the correct Lakeside cutters. These
were never sold with Stanley cutters. Other classic features of these planes
are frog adjusting screw, walnut totes & knobs, unmarked lateral levers,
small diameter brass blade adjuster with 3 rings, lever caps have the blade
width cast into the back. The design of the frog to base is the classic
Marsh design which differs from Stanley and all other planes. Front knobs
are typically walnut with low knob styles for the earlier planes and high
knobs on the later planes.

All of these planes are fairly scarce and some sizes and models are down
right rare. I hope this helps everyone understand the Rockford planes
better.

Randy Osborne
Clyde, NC”
John
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#9
  Re: Rescuing & restoring an old Jack Plane by paulmon (I found this plane r...)
Fantastic! Thanks for the info. So I would say that pretty much takes care of the R5 stamp. Although the blade could be a replacement from another plane, I'm guessing that they also sold to Marshall Wells Hdwe Co. which means that would be the original blade. The frog does not have an adjustment screw in back like my Stanleys do. You just loosen the two screws on top to make an adjustment. I think I have the higher front handle, which would make this a "newer" model.

I poked around the internet for a while and it looks like Marsh &Rockford were bought out by Stanley in 1929 if I'm not mistaken.

Thanks for the info!
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#10
  Re: Rescuing & restoring an old Jack Plane by paulmon (I found this plane r...)
Very nice job on that old classic, Paul - thanks for sharing!

Doug
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#11
  Re: Rescuing & restoring an old Jack Plane by paulmon (I found this plane r...)
Thanks, Paul.  Makes me want to go out to the shop and get going on a couple of project planes that have been sitting out there for a while.
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#12
  Re: Rescuing & restoring an old Jack Plane by paulmon (I found this plane r...)
Marsh did make a block plane, though..
   
   
   
   
Not a bad little plane...
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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