Waterlox for Counter Tops
#15
  Re: RE: Waterlox for Counter Tops by Cabinet Monkey (Osmo. Only way to...)
(08-11-2020, 09:06 PM)Cabinet Monkey Wrote: Osmo.

Only way to fly.

I'd love to see some actual data/photos of test panels with water, alcohol, household cleaners, etc. left on them.  

John
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#16
  Re: Waterlox for Counter Tops by Mr Eddie ([size=medium][font=C...)
I read the information that Osmo publishes.  It sounds like a more durable version of mineral oil and paraffin wax finish for cutting boards.  I am guessing it is using a harder wax; perhaps carnauba wax.

https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-carnauba-wax-607371

Properties and Uses

Carnauba wax has a very high melting point of 82-86 °C (180-187 °F). It is harder than concrete and nearly insoluble in water and ethanol. It is non-toxic and hypoallergenic. It can be polished to a high gloss.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#17
  Re: RE: Waterlox for Counter Tops by Cooler (I read the informati...)
(08-12-2020, 02:07 PM)Cooler Wrote: I read the information that Osmo publishes.  It sounds like a more durable version of mineral oil and paraffin wax finish for cutting boards.  I am guessing it is using a harder wax; perhaps carnauba wax.

https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-carnauba-wax-607371

Properties and Uses

Carnauba wax has a very high melting point of 82-86 °C (180-187 °F). It is harder than concrete and nearly insoluble in water and ethanol. It is non-toxic and hypoallergenic. It can be polished to a high gloss.

Wax harder than concrete?  Seriously?  

John
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#18
  Re: RE: Waterlox for Counter Tops by jteneyck ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(08-12-2020, 02:11 PM)jteneyck Wrote: Wax harder than concrete?  Seriously?  

John

That struck me as a hyperbole, but that was what was written.   This article is perhaps based on more solid ground.  I could not find a chart listing either Shore hardness  or MOHs hardness for waxes so I cannot say how hard a wax is.  Bees wax is very soft and can get sticky.  Carnauba is harder but is difficult to buff to a high shine.  Synthetics can be harder than carnauba.  Despite what common sense would tell you, you cannot build surface thickness with multiple coats of wax.  The solvent in the wax will dissolve the previous coat.  It can ensure that there is a even coating.

https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/w...-finishing

The most common vegetable wax is carnauba, obtained from the leaves of a Brazilian palm tree. Its hardness offers high shine and good durability, but it’s difficult to buff to a consistent sheen, which is why most commercial paste wax formulations combine it with beeswax. Paste wax that’s heavy on carnauba is targeted to the flooring industry. Floor waxes can be used on furniture, but they require serious elbow grease or a power buffer.

Mineral waxes, such as paraffin and microcrystalline wax, are refined from crude oil. Unlike beeswax or carnauba, these synthetic waxes are non-acidic and won’t degrade antique finishes or corrode metals. (Although a bit pricier, microcrystalline has become my go-to wax, because it’s harder and more durable.)
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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