Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal
#11
  
I’ve seen a number of discussions about vertical vs. horizontal, but am trying to figure out the likely impact of vertical storage on the wood over time - I’m a hobbyist and some of the wood can be around for years (at least until I retire when I plan to spend my days in the shop). The location is in the back of the shop in a separate room along the back wall (it’s the only location I have the length). Access to either end is nearly impossible, so I can’t stand at an end to see what’s in the stack if laying flat. I have a 10 foot ceiling and about 12’ long back wall. The left end is full of Koa cutoffs that are vertical. I have approximately 20” from the back wall, so that would be the width of the pile.

All wood has been dry for years, some is rough and some S4S. I live in SoCal, so relatively little humidity. What I’m trying to figure out is whether vertical storage (easiest to pick through) is likely to lead to bowing over time. Woods most frequently stored / used are maple, walnut and white oak. I have a mix of others as well.

Thanks for any input. John
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#12
  Re: Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal by jcredding (I’ve seen a number o...)
I would use vertical storage if I had the height to do so.  As long as the wood is vertical and not leaning at some angle that puts a bow into it it will be fine.  

John
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#13
  Re: RE: Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal by jteneyck (I would use vertical...)
First, I have not come across or seen any commercial (including places that sell lumber) or amateur shops that have a vertical storage system keeping the lumber vertically without any degree of leaning unless you're talking about lumber boxes or carts for shorter pieces. Anything over 8' or so is seen stored in a leaning position for safety reasons.

Second, if space is not an issue, use the horizontal system: long stock and large sheets like MDF and plywood would also thank you for that.

Simon
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#14
  Re: Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal by jcredding (I’ve seen a number o...)
(08-09-2020, 08:44 AM)jcredding Wrote: I’ve seen a number of discussions about vertical vs. horizontal, but am trying to figure out the likely impact of vertical storage on the wood over time - 

Well, as long as the back of your leaners is supported by plywood or laddered like stickers, it'll stay straight.  Two points of contact only is asking for trouble.

FWIW, you've noticed, no doubt, that fuel, air, and ignition produces a fire that climbs? Loose leaners will burn MUCH faster than tight-stacked lumber, because the latter lacks additional air, and isn't being ignited progressively upward.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#15
  Re: Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal by jcredding (I’ve seen a number o...)
There are a couple of advantages to vertical, IMHO. It's a little easier to go through the boards and (obviously) it has a smaller footprint. My wood is on horizontal racks right now, but I plan on changing to a vertical system. True enough, if you don't get the boards up right, they will bow...so you need to get them standing.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#16
  Re: Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal by jcredding (I’ve seen a number o...)
Most every lumber yard I've been to stores lumber horizontally. The ones that I've seen where it's stacked vertically is only to facilitate easier inspection for customers selecting their lumber. From a commercial standpoint, it's much easier to move lumber when it's horizontal. fudge lifts don't work well on vertically stacked lumber.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#17
  Re: RE: Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal by AHill (Most every lumber ya...)
The big/wholesale lumber places I visit store them horizontally and as you said, they have forklifts. When I need something, they use a forklift to bring them down to the floor for me to select (many are well over 12' long). On the other hand, the smaller ones have them kept vertically and leaning on the rack or wall. Their hardwood lumber sections can't be accessed by any forklifts.

Simon
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#18
  Re: Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal by jcredding (I’ve seen a number o...)
I only buy kiln dried wood (no local source for air dried).  As long as it hasn't been planed to thickness, I store it horizontally face-to-face just as it's stored by my supplier.  After I've dimensioned it I store it horizontally on edge on my wall rack.  I've never had a problem with unwanted movement (cupping or twisting).  I usually store my cutoffs vertically just because its easier to see their length if I'm looking for a piece.

Joel
USN (Corpsman) 1968-1972
USAF Retired Aug 31, 1994
Santa Rosa County, Fl Retired Jun 1, 2012
Now just a hobbiest enjoying woodworking!
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#19
  Re: Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal by jcredding (I’ve seen a number o...)
I use vertical storage for my stock.

I have at least dozen boards 10 to 12 feet long, many more 8-10 feet long; most 4/4, a fair number 8/4 to 12/4.  Varied species, mostly walnut and couple nice sticks of mahogany.  A lot of barnwood, mostly pine, but some cherry and oak.

The boards are stacked "nearly vertical.  The bottom of the rear-most 12' board is about 4-5" out from the wall.

Many have been stored vertically for 3+ years.  Jut had them all down and laying out so that I could paint that wall.  Bowing is not an issue with any of it.  Anything that was bowed was already bowed when I put it there.

I've thought about horizontal storage; I probably have the room, but I don't really think it will be more advantageous for me.  If I could have enough storage rack to sort it all by species, that would be one thing, but it wouldn't work out that way.
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#20
  Re: RE: Wood Storage - Vertical v. Horizontal by WxMan (I use vertical stora...)
(08-09-2020, 06:09 PM)WxMan Wrote: The boards are stacked "nearly vertical.  The bottom of the rear-most 12' board is about 4-5" out from the wall.
That kind of leaning is common in the smaller lumber yards I check out. Sometimes worse, not because of the store practice but due to customers sorting and leaving them at greater angles.

Simon
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