circular saw conundrum
#30
  Re: circular saw conundrum by Wild Turkey (In the next couple o...)
Get  a harbor freight 4.5 angle grinder and a masonary wheel
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#31
  Re: circular saw conundrum by Wild Turkey (In the next couple o...)
I looked on line and the most logical solution was this:  "Take it to a place that sells custom granite countertops, and pay them to cut it."
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#32
  Re: RE: circular saw conundrum by Cooler (I looked on line and...)
(08-13-2020, 07:33 AM)Cooler Wrote: I looked on line and the most logical solution was this:  "Take it to a place that sells custom granite countertops, and pay them to cut it."

Awww, that's no fun!!!  Laugh 

I was apprehensive about cutting granite with a cheapo plastic B&D circular saw, but when I got done with the cuts, I did the Tom Hank's fire-making scene in Castaway, except I yelled "I CUT GRANITE!!!!"  My bride got a kick out of that.....
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#33
  Re: circular saw conundrum by Wild Turkey (In the next couple o...)
Since you already have the B&D, I agree to use it for the granite. I'd cut it outside if possible. You can try vacumming the dust as you go, that may save the saw. I have a HF saw that I bought to cut some openings for windows and a door in a brick house. I figured the dust would kill it, and hoped it would survive long enough to do what I needed. It still works but it sounds like a dump truck when it's running.

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#34
  Re: RE: circular saw conundrum by crokett™ (Since you already ha...)
(08-13-2020, 09:58 AM)crokett™ Wrote:  I have a HF saw that I bought to cut some openings for windows and a door in a brick house.  I figured the dust would kill it, and hoped it would survive long enough to do what I needed.   It still works but it sounds like a dump truck when it's running.

I have an old Craftsman CS that I've owned for 40+ years.  I used it 35 years ago, to cut all the steel siding for FIL's 30'x40' pole building that we built.  It got the job done and was still running at the end of the project.  It sounded like a dump truck as well.   Laugh  

I haven't used it much in the last 30 years or so, but saved it incase any more nasty projects came up that I didn't want to use my good saws.  I'll have to dig it out and see if it still works.
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

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#35
  Re: circular saw conundrum by Wild Turkey (In the next couple o...)
I have a neighbor that needed to cut about 25-30lf of asphalt for a new belgian block apron he wanted to install. He bought a dry diamond blade and pulled out a B&D saw that he had used once or twice, but clearly a low end consumer grade saw. I offered one of my worm drives, because the outcome was inevitable. He politely declined. 3/4 of the way thru the saw caught fire. Finished the cut with mine. A believer was made about the power of a WD saw...I just wonder if I'll ever get it back. He's a former Seal Team 6 member, so I will be sure to ask politely <grin>, and just another reason why I have more than one WD saw
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#36
  Re: RE: circular saw conundrum by crokett™ (Since you already ha...)
(08-13-2020, 09:58 AM)crokett™ Wrote: Since you already have the B&D, I agree to use it for the granite.  I'd cut it outside if possible. You can try vacumming the dust as you go, that may save the saw.  I have a HF saw that I bought to cut some openings for windows and a door in a brick house.  I figured the dust would kill it, and hoped it would survive long enough to do what I needed.   It still works but it sounds like a dump truck when it's running.

How did it sound when it was new?


Laugh
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#37
  Re: circular saw conundrum by Wild Turkey (In the next couple o...)
I agree with Wexman...

Step 1. Throw away the not-working C-man. It's not worth the waste of precious gravity. +1 for sure

Step 2. Put a diamond blade on the B&D and cut the slate. If it burns up, who cares? This is definitely the sacrificial job for the B & D

Step 3. Fix the Milwaukee or buy a Dewalt 575 with the electric brake. It's light and about $125. I own a few of them and use them regularly. I occasionally have the need for the torque of a worm drive and grab an old SkillSaw when needed. the DW 575 is my go-to saw, worms are too heavy for constant use.
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#38
  Re: circular saw conundrum by Wild Turkey (In the next couple o...)
I'm way late for this one, but for future readers here is what works for me. And, I've cut a lot of stone, both granite and marble this way.

First be sure to use a double insulated saw. If you have any doubt, plug into a GFCI protected circuit. Rig up a way to supply water to the work. A piece of 1/4" clear plastic tubing with a faucet adapter works well. Turn the water on to a solid trickle. Use an edge guide, my HF clamp/guides for fine for this. Set the saw down facing forward at the 'normal' ending of the cut. Direct the water stream at the back edge of the blade. A couple of wire ties holding it to the saw usually works. Now pull the saw backward.

Cutting in reverse does two things for you. Top side chipping is greatly reduced. If you hold it really straight there will be no chipping. The blade cutting downward doesn't put as much dust (in water) into the air. Because of that, the saw wear and tear is greatly reduced.
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