Steel Door Trim
#11
  
The trim around the window on my front entry door is cracked.  It's a steel door.  Can I pull this off and glue new pvc trim in it's place?   Or is there better option? I hate to replace the whole door.  It's protected from the weather by a storm door.


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#12
  Re: Steel Door Trim by badwhiskey (The trim around the ...)
I'd glue on new wood trim myself.  The vinyl or PVC would crack before wood.  I'd also consider 3m VHB tape instead of glue.
WoodNET... the new safespace
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#13
  Re: RE: Steel Door Trim by Splinter Puller (I'd glue on new wood...)
On my old steel door there was a mating piece of trim on the inside of the door and they were connected by screws from the inside. I'm surprised yours isn't constructed the same way if that's an insulated glass unit.  
Does your door get sun on it?  I suspect it does and would be the reason the PVC trim is all cracked.  That storm door is baking everything it covers.  It's a really good thing you have a steel door; a wooden one wouldn't fair as well.  It would be best to vent the storm door, and to put heat reflective film on the glass, to reduce the temperature on the main door.  That should make it possible to use PVC trim again w/o it cracking, but there's nothing wrong going with painted wood either, as suggested above.
John
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#14
  Re: Steel Door Trim by badwhiskey (The trim around the ...)
I had the same problem.  I removed the trim and replaced it with wood molding.  As I recall I used brick mold and I cut a rabbet.  It was the only standard molding that was deep enough to allow for the rabbet.

I believe I used a combination of E6000 adhesive and masking tape to keep it in place while it cured.  You can pre-drill and countersink for sheet metal screws.  Just make sure that the screws do not try to enter the glass.

The molding was just cheap plastic and probably not UV rated.
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#15
  Re: Steel Door Trim by badwhiskey (The trim around the ...)
I also think the storm door has something to do with the cause. We have fiberglass and the instructions said to use a "vented storm door". I bet the right glass store or lumber yard would be able to fix you up with the moulding, but I also like the idea of wood fastened with tape.
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#16
  Re: RE: Steel Door Trim by jteneyck (On my old steel door...)
(08-11-2020, 08:46 AM)jteneyck Wrote: That storm door is baking everything it covers.

Common problem, especially if it's in direct sunlight. Usually those steel doors have a disclaimer in the warranty stating that the warranty is void if a non vented storm door is used.

I'd replace it with wood.

Usually those plastic trim pieces are part of the glass frame. So they really don't come out. They're screwed on from the inside. Probably plugs in the screw holes.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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#17
  Re: Steel Door Trim by badwhiskey (The trim around the ...)
You might be able to find a replacement light. Is the manufacturer's name on the door? The distributor for the door can order replacement lights. Here's a few.. https://www.allaboutdoors.com/Products/T...Door-Lites
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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#18
  Re: RE: Steel Door Trim by Snipe Hunter (You might be able to...)
(08-12-2020, 06:15 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: You might be able to find a replacement light. Is the manufacturer's name on the door? The distributor for the door can order replacement lights. Here's a few.. https://www.allaboutdoors.com/Products/T...Door-Lites

I am pretty sure I have that identical door and I experienced the identical problem.  There was a screen door, but no storm door so I don't think it related to the storm door type.

Mine is a particularly cheap door.  I am not sure replacing the lite makes any sense.  I did replace the molding inside and out. Be sure to paint both sides of the molding where it attached to the glass.  The  reverse side will be visible when viewed at an  angle.

If I have further problems with this door I will replace it.  I will perhaps find a solid core exterior door and put the old insulated lite from the existing door in it.  There is nothing wrong with the glass.  The steel is very thin, and they are using plastic molding.  It seemed cheap when I took apart the old plastic molding.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#19
  Re: RE: Steel Door Trim by jteneyck (On my old steel door...)
(08-11-2020, 08:46 AM)jteneyck Wrote: On my old steel door there was a mating piece of trim on the inside of the door and they were connected by screws from the inside. I'm surprised yours isn't constructed the same way if that's an insulated glass unit.  
Does your door get sun on it?  I suspect it does and would be the reason the PVC trim is all cracked.  That storm door is baking everything it covers.  It's a really good thing you have a steel door; a wooden one wouldn't fair as well.  It would be best to vent the storm door, and to put heat reflective film on the glass, to reduce the temperature on the main door.  That should make it possible to use PVC trim again w/o it cracking, but there's nothing wrong going with painted wood either, as suggested above.
John

Thanks for all of the replies.  I hadn't noticed, but yeah there are plugged screw holes on the inside!
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#20
  Re: RE: Steel Door Trim by badwhiskey ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(08-12-2020, 10:06 AM)badwhiskey Wrote: Thanks for all of the replies.  I hadn't noticed, but yeah there are plugged screw holes on the inside!

If you use screws make sure that you don't try to screw into the glass.

The bottom screws are important as they keep the glass from sliding down in the channel.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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