Painting MDF
#10
  
Good morning all, I am looking for information on the best sealing practices for MDF before I spray paint it. I cut some letters out this weekend and am placing them on a sign and want to spray paint them. I am assuming that the edges will be like sponges and suck up the paint.

Any thought and insight?
Grant

"GO BUCKEYES"
Reply
#11
  Re: Painting MDF by gad5264 (Good morning all, I ...)
Is this an outdoor sign? Anyway, the edges will suck up paint but if you seal them first with a good primer (I prefer an oil based version) you should be just fine. It wouldn't be a bad idea to use the primer over the smooth surfaces as well.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
Reply
#12
  Re: Painting MDF by gad5264 (Good morning all, I ...)
Only the machined edges require special attention.  The factory surfaces take paint beautifully.  If you dress the edges with Sealcoat it will dry in 20 minutes and you can then apply the primer. 

Putting a waterbased paint over the machined edges will allow the fibers to expand and it will have the texture of 40 grit sandpaper.

If you want a very smooth finish on the machined edges then you should add filler to the surface before the shellac.  I like to use Parks' grain filler (usually used for oak flooring) as it dries very quickly, sands easily and takes paint well. 

Hand sand the machined surfaces.  Use the grain filler like shoe polish and rub it into the pores with a rag.  Wait 30 minutes to 2 hours for it to dry and then hand sand again.  Then seal with Sealcoat and then prime and paint.

Plaster joint compound works too but dries slower and sands messier.  I would suggest that MDF is an indoor product only (and not to be used in bathrooms or places with lots of moisture).  MDO is designed for exterior applications.


No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#13
  Re: Painting MDF by gad5264 (Good morning all, I ...)
Thanks guys, this is an indoor sign for an office.
Grant

"GO BUCKEYES"
Reply
#14
  Re: RE: Painting MDF by gad5264 (Thanks guys, this is...)
I use joint compound for the edges because it's cheap - and works fine.  I prime everything with BIN white pigmented shellac based primer before painting.  In addition to sealing the surfaces it also helps cover the brown color of the MDF so only two coats of paint are needed to get the true color.  

John
Reply
#15
  Re: RE: Painting MDF by jteneyck (I use joint compound...)
(08-24-2020, 10:03 AM)jteneyck Wrote: I use joint compound for the edges because it's cheap - and works fine.  I prime everything with BIN white pigmented shellac based primer before painting.  In addition to sealing the surfaces it also helps cover the brown color of the MDF so only two coats of paint are needed to get the true color.  

John
I would note that some of the acrylic finishes are not happy to go over shellac.

PPG's Breakthrough will craze over shellac.  I have not tested other acrylic finishes.  So testing might be a good idea.  As mentioned in my earlier post the joint compound works fine.  It is slower drying and messier sanding than the grain filler.  A tub of grain filler will last a very long time.  Especially if you wrap the lid with Saran wrap to keep it "fresh".
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#16
  Re: RE: Painting MDF by Cooler ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(08-24-2020, 12:49 PM)Cooler Wrote: I would note that some of the acrylic finishes are not happy to go over shellac.

PPG's Breakthrough will craze over shellac.  I have not tested other acrylic finishes.  So testing might be a good idea.  As mentioned in my earlier post the joint compound works fine.  It is slower drying and messier sanding than the grain filler.  A tub of grain filler will last a very long time.  Especially if you wrap the lid with Saran wrap to keep it "fresh".

That's why it's always wise to test out the entire finishing process on scrap.  I personally haven't had any compatibility problems yet, but I know it can happen as you pointed out with regards to Breakthrough.  

John
Reply
#17
  Re: RE: Painting MDF by jteneyck ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(08-24-2020, 01:14 PM)jteneyck Wrote: That's why it's always wise to test out the entire finishing process on scrap.  I personally haven't had any compatibility problems yet, but I know it can happen as you pointed out with regards to Breakthrough.  

John

Breakthrough 250 is a terrific cabinet paint.  It allows recoating in about 20 minutes and it is ready to install in 4 hours.  And no "blocking" (sticking together of painted surfaces).

I have to special order this.  The local stores only carry  Breakthrough 50,  a lower VOC formulation.  PPG is not recommending Breakthrough  50 for cabinets.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#18
  Re: RE: Painting MDF by Cooler ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(08-25-2020, 08:40 AM)Cooler Wrote: Breakthrough 250 is a terrific cabinet paint.  It allows recoating in about 20 minutes and it is ready to install in 4 hours.  And no "blocking" (sticking together of painted surfaces).

I have to special order this.  The local stores only carry  Breakthrough 50,  a lower VOC formulation.  PPG is not recommending Breakthrough  50 for cabinets.

I haven't tried Breakthrough yet but likely would if there were a PPG outlet nearby.  But I recently used SW's Emerald Urethane Trim Enamel on some kitchen cabinet doors and drawer fronts and it's amazing stuff.  It's a WB urethane alkyd oil, similar in many ways to BM's Advance, but dries and cures a lot faster, though not as fast as you mentioned for Breakthrough.  It sprays beautifully and flows out great, just like Advance, ready for recoat in 4 hours.  It's available in all of SW's colors and sheens.  

John
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.