First time to do bowls
#9
I’ve turned plenty of spindle type stuff but want to get into bowls. I have the smaller Excelsior lathe and it came with a screw plate. I understand that I can use that for at least the top or the bottom of the bowl but how do I do the other side? I saw a video using double stick tape to hold it. I know I should at some point get a chuck or similar.

Thanks.
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#10
When I first started turning I had no chuck for a year or so and used the 10" PSI Commander lathe.  I did what others here suggested and that is make a foot on the bottom and turn it around and make a Jam chuck to fit the foot you just made.

At the time I had a lot of Red Oak so I put it on a face plate and used it until I had to make another one.  It started off 4" thick and ended up 1" just where the screw points started.
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#11
(08-27-2020, 01:50 PM)macpianoman Wrote: I’ve turned plenty of spindle type stuff but want to get into bowls. I have the smaller Excelsior lathe and it came with a screw plate. I understand that I can use that for at least the top or the bottom of the bowl but how do I do the other side? I saw a video using double stick tape to hold it. I know I should at some point get a chuck or similar.

Thanks.

The only thing that comes to my mind, is to attach a sacrificial board to the bottom of your bowl blank (what will become the bottom of the bowl). Attach it by glueing with 2 pieces of the newspaper. It has to be a good glueup. Then complete the outside of the bowl, then the inside of the bowl. The sacrificial board should break apart at the newspaper seam, after you completed the bowl. To finish off the bottom, you will have to make a jamb chuck, or just use handtools to complete.

The reason for the sacrificial board, is so that no screw holes show.

my 2¢

ETA: Oh yea... I realize you're an experienced spindle guy, but be careful. Working the inside of a bowl, is a unique skill/knowledge. And ONLY use a bowl gouge when working it, unless you're a scraper kind of guy.

ETAA: Use your tailstock until you are ready to work the inside of the bowl.
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#12
(08-27-2020, 01:50 PM)macpianoman Wrote: I’ve turned plenty of spindle type stuff but want to get into bowls. I have the smaller Excelsior lathe and it came with a screw plate. I understand that I can use that for at least the top or the bottom of the bowl but how do I do the other side? I saw a video using double stick tape to hold it. I know I should at some point get a chuck or similar.

Thanks.

A chuck is not essential but sure makes it faster and easier to turn a bowl. Perhaps my video might help.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIqCQxWUkTk&t=8s
Mike

"Start off slow and taper off."
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#13
(09-08-2020, 07:23 AM)mpax356 Wrote: A chuck is not essential but sure makes it faster and easier to turn a bowl. Perhaps my video might help.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIqCQxWUkTk&t=8s

How do you turn a bowl with a chuck if you dont want the foot on the bottom?
Also when using newspaper to clue on a drive disc, someone said use 2 pieces? Why?
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#14
How did your bowl go? What did you end up doing? An update would be interesting.
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#15
(09-08-2020, 07:23 AM)mpax356 Wrote: A chuck is not essential but sure makes it faster and easier to turn a bowl. Perhaps my video might help.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIqCQxWUkTk&t=8s

None of my bowls have feet.  I turn the outside and then the inside with the bowl on the chuck.  I leave the tailstock and live center in place as along as possible for stability.  I use a tenon on the bowl for the chuck to grab, but you can also use a mortise and expand the chuck. 

When it's done, except for the bottom, I turn the bowl around and use a doughnut chuck I made which is mounted to a faceplate.  I then turn off the tenon from the bottom.  Here's one way to make a doughnut chuck: https://www.instructables.com/Doughnut-Chuck/
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#16
I like to use a mortise and Chuck. I have better luck with the mortise over the tenon. When I finish I have my emblem I glue into the mortise to fill it in.
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