Resaw King or WoodMaster CT
#27
  Re: Resaw King or WoodMaster CT by jussi (I picked up a Laguna...)
Well for once my procrastination paid off.  Looks like Laguna just started a 10% off sale! woohoo
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#28
  Re: Resaw King or WoodMaster CT by jussi (I picked up a Laguna...)
The resaw king is on my mm20 now. I like it. I own woodmaster ct and trimasters too. All are good. I send my blades in to be shapened. I am not sharpening a 200 or 300 dollar blade on a dremel myself.


Glad its my shop I am responsible for - I only have to make me happy.

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#29
  Re: RE: Resaw King or WoodMaster CT by jussi ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(09-03-2020, 09:18 PM)jussi Wrote: Thanks John.  I'll order the 1".

Any recommendations on tension gauge.  Alot of them are pretty pricey and I'm not looking to spend a few hundred on one.

I like this one and it costs almost nothing:  Link

John
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#30
  Re: RE: Resaw King or WoodMaster CT by SteveS (You don't need a ten...)
(09-04-2020, 05:44 AM)SteveS Wrote: You don't need a tension gauge. All you need is a set of calipers; digital or dial. Measure the strain rate and you can convert to stress based on Young's Modulus.

I used this method to correlate the gauge on my MM16 and it's pretty close. I use 1-1/4 Lenox Woodmaster C carbon blades and it will tension them easily to 25 ksi.

Could you explain this for us? I could probably Google it but then I'd have to figure out which You-Tuber is speaking from experience from the others that read about it somewhere/sometime on the web. This is a great forum to learn from because if anyone throws out some b.s., they'll get (usually politely) called on it. I have a 36" refurbished Cresent running a 1" x 18' x2 tpi Timberwolf. I don't always remember to loosen the tension and I've never really known what it was or should be.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#31
  Re: RE: Resaw King or WoodMaster CT by MstrCarpenter ([quote='SteveS' pid=...)
(09-05-2020, 08:30 PM)MstrCarpenter Wrote: Could you explain this for us? I could probably Google it but then I'd have to figure out which You-Tuber is speaking from experience from the others that read about it somewhere/sometime on the web. This is a great forum to learn from because if anyone throws out some b.s., they'll get (usually politely) called on it. I have a 36" refurbished Cresent running a 1" x 18' x2 tpi Timberwolf. I don't always remember to loosen the tension and I've never really known what it was or should be.

For a saw with that much resaw height you would be better off using a tension gage like i showed in the link above, or a set of 12" Vernier calipers because the calculated tension is dependent upon measuring the strain accurately.  But if want to use a set of 6" Verniers then just follow the directions I posted in the link above.  Strain is still the amount of blade elongation / the distance between the caliper jaws at zero tension.  Use tiny little C-clamps to clamp the jaws of the Verniers to the back side of the blade with the jaws separated nearly their full extension.  

For example, if you measured 0.004" of elongation and the jaw separation was 5.52" at zero tension, then the strain = 0.004/5.52 = 0.000725 inches/inch

Young's Modulus for steel is about 29 million psi, so the tension in the blade = 29 x 10^6 x 0.000725 = 21014 psi.  

John
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#32
  Re: RE: Resaw King or WoodMaster CT by jteneyck ([quote='MstrCarpente...)
(09-06-2020, 09:25 AM)jteneyck Wrote: For a saw with that much resaw height you would be better off using a tension gage like i showed in the link above, or a set of 12" Vernier calipers because the calculated tension is dependent upon measuring the strain accurately.  But if want to use a set of 6" Verniers then just follow the directions I posted in the link above.  Strain is still the amount of blade elongation / the distance between the caliper jaws at zero tension.  Use tiny little C-clamps to clamp the jaws of the Verniers to the back side of the blade with the jaws separated nearly their full extension.  

For example, if you measured 0.004" of elongation and the jaw separation was 5.52" at zero tension, then the strain = 0.004/5.52 = 0.000725 inches/inch

Young's Modulus for steel is about 29 million psi, so the tension in the blade = 29 x 10^6 x 0.000725 = 21014 psi.  

John
Yes it does have height! As soon as I put a blade on it I had to try cutting some veneer. 100+ year, old growth, clear, pumpkin orange pine. 18" wide x 40" long  x 3/32 book-matched x 3 ready to glue with only a card scraper. I was impressed.

Couple of quick questions. Is Young's Modulus for steel similar to modules of elasticity that I use along with extreme force in bending to determine lumber sizing? I have a few 6" dial verniers, I'm not sure how large my largest micrometer is, and I have a few dial indicators.  It's more accurate to measure a larger distance, but is it worth it? Harbor Freight has a 12" for $50 if you think it's accurate enough, I'll buy it. I'm pretty good at math so I think I can get rid of the 10^6 power and deal with a few less zeros. I could also save a little trial and error by starting with the desired tension and converting it to a dimension. So the last question is what tension should I be aiming for?
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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