Building a shed, can the trim go on AFTER the T-111 vs before?
#9
  
Hi,
I'm helping a neighbor rebuild his shed (or more accurately, extend the short shed that was there to be full height).  In the picture you can see the remnants of the old, shorter shed we're building off of now.  Right now, the taller shed is sheathed and we got the tar paper on the roof yesterday.  We'll shingle it this weekend and start attaching the T-111 he bought (not my 1st choice of siding material, but it is his nickel).

Anyways, on my shed I attached the corner boards and the installed the clapboards (much easier to custom cut each corner board in my situation).  If I go this route on his shed (and if things are not perfectly vertical/square, we'll need to futz with each sheet to get it to butt up to the trim at the corner boards (pre-primed pine) and around the door/window openings.  

If I put the T-111 on 1st, run it to the edges/window/door openings and then attach the trim/cornerboards, there's more room for "forgiveness".  In either case I think we'll caulk where the 2 materials meet to stop water intrusion.

Any problem going the sheathing then trim route?


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Dumber than I appear
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#10
  Re: Building a shed, can the trim go on AFTER the T-111 vs before? by Dumb_Polack (Hi, I'm helping a n...)
(09-21-2020, 11:00 AM)Dumb_Polack Wrote: Hi,
I'm helping a neighbor rebuild his shed (or more accurately, extend the short shed that was there to be full height).  In the picture you can see the remnants of the old, shorter shed we're building off of now.  Right now, the taller shed is sheathed and we got the tar paper on the roof yesterday.  We'll shingle it this weekend and start attaching the T-111 he bought (not my 1st choice of siding material, but it is his nickel).

Anyways, on my shed I attached the corner boards and the installed the clapboards (much easier to custom cut each corner board in my situation).  If I go this route on his shed (and if things are not perfectly vertical/square, we'll need to futz with each sheet to get it to butt up to the trim at the corner boards (pre-primed pine) and around the door/window openings.  

If I put the T-111 on 1st, run it to the edges/window/door openings and then attach the trim/cornerboards, there's more room for "forgiveness".  In either case I think we'll caulk where the 2 materials meet to stop water intrusion.

Any problem going the sheathing then trim route?

all my buildings have trim over the siding.  though I used smart siding (looks like T-111) instead of real T-111.   Less maintenance, more rot resistance with smart siding.

caulk where the trim meets the siding, especially on the horizontal trim where water could sit.

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away. - Philip K. Dick

Mark

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#11
  Re: RE: Building a shed, can the trim go on AFTER the T-111 vs before? by meackerman ([quote='Dumb_Polack'...)
(09-21-2020, 11:20 AM)meackerman Wrote: all my buildings have trim over the siding.  though I used smart siding (looks like T-111) instead of real T-111.   Less maintenance, more rot resistance with smart siding.

caulk where the trim meets the siding, especially on the horizontal trim where water could sit.

Think I'll go that route (+ caulk).  It'll make life easier.
Dumber than I appear
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#12
  Re: Building a shed, can the trim go on AFTER the T-111 vs before? by Dumb_Polack (Hi, I'm helping a n...)
Yes, sheet goods first, then trim. At my last house, I went with hardipanel (cement board) and Hardiplank trim. It was next to a pool, so waterproofing was paramount. I would do it again.
Rocket Science is more fun when you actually have rockets. 

"The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government." -- Patrick Henry
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#13
  Re: Building a shed, can the trim go on AFTER the T-111 vs before? by Dumb_Polack (Hi, I'm helping a n...)
Yup you don't trim before your sheathing. 

        With a siding you already have a plywood sheathing that is your structural skin. Then you put your decorative trim and decorative siding on. With T111 it is your structural skin and your decorative layer all in one. The trim is just to make the corners look better. 

     When I have built sheds with T111 I paint everything on all 6 sides including the trim before assembly. Then when the trim is installed I DO NOT CAULK. The building looks way way better and much more crisp if you don't caulk. I know you will say the water will get in there and rot it out. From past experience and looking at many failures the buildings that failed first were the ones that were caulked because they trapped in all that moisture. 
      I built a shed for my dad back in the early 90s and today it still looks nearly like a new building with no rot and has only had one repaint of the trim because the red fades quicker than the body color. 

    My personal preference of how to do it would be to clad it all in Zip sheathing tape up the joints and then use a pre painted cement board siding. That way it will outlast you and the next guy and won't require any painting for decades. And I will second that smartside is a better product to use than T111 these days. The T111 available is very thin these days and hard to get in 10' lengths anymore. The smart side is more durable against water and much stronger to start with. T111 is very weak with those long grooves cut down it removing much of it's strength.
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#14
  Re: Building a shed, can the trim go on AFTER the T-111 vs before? by Dumb_Polack (Hi, I'm helping a n...)
I would have used hardiepanel siding for my buildings, but the county won't allow it with a structural skin under it...so costing more money.    They said hardiepanel doesn't meet their requirements for sheer strength.



So we used smartsiding, which is ok to use without anything under it.

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away. - Philip K. Dick

Mark

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#15
  Re: RE: Building a shed, can the trim go on AFTER the T-111 vs before? by meackerman (I would have used ha...)
(09-21-2020, 12:21 PM)meackerman Wrote: I would have used hardiepanel siding for my buildings, but the county won't allow it with a structural skin under it...so costing more money.    They said hardiepanel doesn't meet their requirements for sheer strength.



So we used smartsiding, which is ok to use without anything under it.

Yep, LP Smartsiding siding on my solar kiln, then the trim.
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#16
  Re: RE: Building a shed, can the trim go on AFTER the T-111 vs before? by meackerman (I would have used ha...)
(09-21-2020, 12:21 PM)meackerman Wrote: I would have used hardiepanel siding for my buildings, but the county won't allow it with a structural skin under it...so costing more money.    They said hardiepanel doesn't meet their requirements for sheer strength.



So we used smartsiding, which is ok to use without anything under it.


            Yup. Cement board has no strength. It's thin concrete and brittle. Going that route is best IMO but allot more than just smartside. I would love to rip the brick off our house and put on a layer of ZIP-R and cement board siding. Brick is a horrible building material here. It heat soaks all day and releases that heat into the house all night and it's a sponge when it gets wet and they sunshine drives the moisture to the inside.
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