smelly cherry?
#11
  
I started machining a piece of cherry this afternoon, and it seemed to have a different smell.  I used bandsaw and table saw, and while neither had a real sharp blade, there was no burn marks on the wood.

This is some home sawed lumber that has probably dried for at least 10 years (1" thick).  Have you ever had this happen, or is it me?  My wife also noticed an order in the house (not blaming me directly).

Most comments welcome
Reply
#12
  Re: smelly cherry? by toolmiser (I started machining ...)
Is it some spalted cherry?
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








Reply
#13
  Re: smelly cherry? by toolmiser (I started machining ...)
I don't know about cherry but I am working with some Calico Hickory. Nice grain pattern, boy does it stink. I can smell it on my hands even after washing them.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
20 year cancer survivor
Reply
#14
  Re: smelly cherry? by toolmiser (I started machining ...)
No it isn't spalted.
Reply
#15
  Re: smelly cherry? by toolmiser (I started machining ...)
I've used some cherry as after all there is plenty to be found around here (PA). I've sourced it rough from lumber stores (KD) and places like Craigslist , Offer Up etc. The latter ones have been either KD or air dried. The air dried is my preference if I can get it. The smell is stronger than the KD but I've noticed a richer color along with there being less internal pressures in it. It may be something in my head but I didn't notice the differences noted until I was doing a project where the two types were mixed. Just my two cents.
Reply
#16
  Re: smelly cherry? by toolmiser (I started machining ...)
I bought some walnut at auction once.  It had been air dried in a barn.  The raccoons evidently liked to "hang out" on top of the pile.

It smelled like the South end of a Northbound raccoon.  Yep, all of the way through the board.

I only used it to make "special projects" for the ones that deserved them.  No, seriously I ended up throwing most of it away.
Know Guns. Know Security. Know Freedom - - - No Guns. No Security. No Freedom

Guns are supposed to be dangerous. If yours is not dangerous you need to take it to a gunsmith and have it repaired.
Reply
#17
  Re: smelly cherry? by toolmiser (I started machining ...)
I've never had cherry smell bad. Is there any chance it was contaminated in some way? (cat pee, or such?)
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
Reply
#18
  Re: smelly cherry? by toolmiser (I started machining ...)
I've got a confession, as I looked at it today, I'm pretty sure it is ash. I know I should be able to tell the difference between the two. I was a quite a ways into machining it before I figured it out. Fortunately it's just "feet" for a unicycle stand so it won't make a difference. (please don't rat me out, I will tell her it was by design.). It was just a short board that I had in storage, I saw it and thought cherry since it was laying next to my cherry.

We don't have a cat, and dog doesn't enjoy my shop (just has never liked stairs). It was air dryed outside at least 10 years ago, and it's possible that some outdoor creature did water it long ago.

Thanks
Reply
#19
  Re: RE: smelly cherry? by toolmiser (I've got a confessio...)
(11-17-2020, 08:42 PM)toolmiser Wrote: I've got a confession, as I looked at it today, I'm pretty sure it is ash.  I know I should be able to tell the difference between the two.  I was a quite a ways into machining it before I figured it out. 

Laugh Laugh Laugh Laugh Laugh Laugh  That, of course, has never, ever happened to anyone else here. Winkgrin
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
Reply
#20
  Re: RE: smelly cherry? by toolmiser (I've got a confessio...)
(11-17-2020, 08:42 PM)toolmiser Wrote: I've got a confession, as I looked at it today, I'm pretty sure it is ash.  I know I should be able to tell the difference between the two.  I was a quite a ways into machining it before I figured it out.

. . . snip

https://www.forums.woodnet.net/showthrea...id=7358985
Know Guns. Know Security. Know Freedom - - - No Guns. No Security. No Freedom

Guns are supposed to be dangerous. If yours is not dangerous you need to take it to a gunsmith and have it repaired.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.