Diamond stone question
#16
  Re: RE: Diamond stone question by Admiral ([quote='hbmcc' pid='...)
(12-16-2020, 09:51 AM)Admiral Wrote: http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/reada..._958.shtml

.......................
From the link.........
"If you find that your chisel does not chip but feels dull, experiment with buffing less making the contact angle with the buffing wheel more acute."

I think this is the point where people have the most trouble with buffing for a sharp edge..whether I am buffing on muslim, leather or felt, I deliberately start my buffing high up on the bevel and away from the edge...then slowly raise the tool's edge towards the wheel..I look for the fine line of "swarf" {in reality just buffing compound} that appears at the very edge and hold the tool at that angle for about 15 seconds or so...This IMO is where the method gets tricky..people either don't go far enough...OR they go too far, blunting the edge. This is also the point where skill is needed and that comes from good practice and tool control. But it is darn well worth it IMO..Why spend an hour sharpening a tool when it can be done in just minutes on a buffer...unless of course you like sharpening and using machines as much as I do.. Big Grin

The little home made machine I frequently use for sharpening woodcarving knives but works fine for chisels etc.. Home made felt wheel shown.




Clean cut in two directions in a paper towel...If your edge can do this it is pretty sharp...Cut made while holding the towel in the air and not laying on a surface..


"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





Reply
#17
  Re: RE: Diamond stone question by Timberwolf ([quote='Admiral' pid...)
(12-16-2020, 10:10 AM)Timberwolf Wrote: .......................
From the link.........
"If you find that your chisel does not chip but feels dull, experiment with buffing less making the contact angle with the buffing wheel more acute."

I think this is the point where people have the most trouble with buffing for a sharp edge..whether I am buffing on muslim, leather or felt, I deliberately start my buffing high up on the bevel and away from the edge...then slowly raise the tool's edge towards the wheel..I look for the fine line of "swarf" {in reality just buffing compound} that appears at the very edge and hold the tool at that angle for about 15 seconds or so...This IMO is where the method gets tricky..people either don't go far enough...OR they go too far, blunting the edge. This is also the point where skill is needed and that comes from good practice and tool control. But it is darn well worth it IMO..Why spend an hour sharpening a tool when it can be done in just minutes on a buffer...unless of course you like sharpening and using machines as much as I do.. Big Grin

The little home made machine I frequently use for sharpening woodcarving knives but works fine for chisels etc.. Home made felt wheel shown.




Clean cut in two directions in a paper towel...If your edge can do this it is pretty sharp...Cut made while holding the towel in the air and not laying on a surface..



They sell paper towels with pre-perforated sections now. No need to cut your own.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#18
  Re: Diamond stone question by clovishound (I finally pulled the...)
I have heard a lot of issues with the xxf on other forums. I also never felt it gave an edge as fine as my waterstones and I don't like how stropping dulls the corners on chisels.

I have since switched my final stones to a hard(medium) and black oilstone from Dan's Whetstone. Still use the diamonds for "extra coarse" through "fine". The "surgical black stones produce a fabulous edge and I don't have to use them with water. Mess is much easier to contain.


Rarely neesld to use anything but the oilstones unless I chip an edge somewhere.
Reply
#19
  Re: Diamond stone question by clovishound (I finally pulled the...)
Well, I called DMT. Unfortunately, it was the online store, not the manufacturer. He was nice enough to suggest that I gently use the coarse stone to bring down any diamonds sticking up too far.

I tried this and it seemed to work. The stone may need some additional break in, but I can live with the stone now. If it settles down to a finer pattern than I get now, I will be happy.

I do have a hard arkansas stone I use for the final hone. I was able to put a nice edge on my A2 Hock iron using just the two stones and the strop. Next time I will use the arkansas stone before stropping.

I might spring for the fine stone, if I like the system. The coarse stone does bring the bevel down rather quickly.
"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
Reply
#20
  Re: RE: Diamond stone question by clovishound (Well, I called DMT. ...)
(12-16-2020, 11:47 PM)clovishound Wrote: Well, I called DMT. Unfortunately, it was the online store, not the manufacturer. He was nice enough to suggest that I gently use the coarse stone to bring down any diamonds sticking up too far.

I tried this and it seemed to work. The stone may need some additional break in, but I can live with the stone now. If it settles down to a finer pattern than I get now, I will be happy.

I do have a hard arkansas stone I use for the final hone. I was able to put a nice edge on my A2 Hock iron using just the two stones and the strop. Next time I will use the arkansas stone before stropping.

I might spring for the fine stone, if I like the system. The coarse stone does bring the bevel down rather quickly.
...................................
If it settles down to a finer pattern than I get now, I will be happy.

It will........much finer.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.