spokeshaves
#11
  
With my foray into spoon carving, I find I am in need of a better spokeshave. I picked up one at a flea marker years ago. It is a generic, cast bevel down without adjusters. The big problem I have with it is the cap is not well designed. If I slide it down to the bottom of the keyhole, it occludes the opening. I could grind the edge down, but to get it where it needs to be, I would grind past the other end of the keyhole. When I get it adjusted, it works well enough, but any time I have to remove the iron, it is a real pain to get it adjusted again, and leaving the cap loose enough to easily adjust means it will come loose when trying to adjust. Also, someone freehanded a really shallow angle on the bevel, and trying to get this straightened out would shorten an already short iron too much. I could probably do some work on it, and get it more usable, but think it's just not worth the effort.

So, I'm looking for a new one. I don't have access to good flea markets where I live, and even when my brother and I were going to some of the good ones in Fla, I seldom saw spokeshaves.

I'm hesitating between something like a Kunz bevel down, or perhaps go with the Lee Valley bevel up. I suspect the bevel up would be harder to sharper, but I should be able to manage. I think I would prefer a bevel down, but don't really feel like spending the $ on a Lee Valley or Pinnacle. The LV bevel up is about as much as I am willing to spend right now.

[Image: 05P3273-veritas-low-angle-spokeshave-pm-v11-f-04-1.jpg]

Lee Valley

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"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
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#12
  Re: spokeshaves by clovishound (With my foray into s...)
Hmmm....there ARE more options out there....including the Millers Falls No. 1.......and a few older ones...like this..
   
Seymour Smith & Sons.  I also have a Stanley that looks almost like this.    I was rounding over the sharp edges along the top of the handle, and along the sides of the tray....wood is Aromatic Red Cedar....not the easiest to plane, anyway....

My spokeshaves are bevel down....YMMV.
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#13
  Re: spokeshaves by clovishound (With my foray into s...)
(01-02-2021, 02:54 PM)clovishound Wrote: With my foray into spoon carving, I find I am in need of a better spokeshave. I picked up one at a flea marker years ago. It is a generic, cast bevel down without adjusters. The big problem I have with it is the cap is not well designed. If I slide it down to the bottom of the keyhole, it occludes the opening. I could grind the edge down, but to get it where it needs to be, I would grind past the other end of the keyhole. When I get it adjusted, it works well enough, but any time I have to remove the iron, it is a real pain to get it adjusted again, and leaving the cap loose enough to easily adjust means it will come loose when trying to adjust. Also, someone freehanded a really shallow angle on the bevel, and trying to get this straightened out would shorten an already short iron too much. I could probably do some work on it, and get it more usable, but think it's just not worth the effort.

So, I'm looking for a new one. I don't have access to good flea markets where I live, and even when my brother and I were going to some of the good ones in Fla, I seldom saw spokeshaves.

I'm hesitating between something like a Kunz bevel down, or perhaps go with the Lee Valley bevel up. I suspect the bevel up would be harder to sharper, but I should be able to manage. I think I would prefer a bevel down, but don't really feel like spending the $ on a Lee Valley or Pinnacle. The LV bevel up is about as much as I am willing to spend right now.

[Image: 05P3273-veritas-low-angle-spokeshave-pm-v11-f-04-1.jpg]

Lee Valley

Opinions?
............
My preference is a Stanly #53 with an adjustable mouth.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





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#14
  Re: spokeshaves by clovishound (With my foray into s...)
I have had very good luck using a Kunz, with a Hock blade. The casting is not very accurate, and I had to file the mouth some. That done, and with Ron's aftermarket blade upgrade, it is an excellent tool.


My favorite flat-bottom shave is one I made, using TeachShave instructions. Link on Hock Tools web site
I used a piece of Bubinga and a Hock blade. inexpensive, not terribly difficult to build, and works very well. Mine is the one on the bottom (other 2 were gifts).

[Image: Spokeshaves%20Dec%202012%2001-M.jpg]
Best,
Aram, always learning

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: My woodworking photo site
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#15
  Re: spokeshaves by clovishound (With my foray into s...)
I have the same shave in my arsenal. Not a fan of the way the blade is held in a wedge design. It keeps slipping out. There is a woodriver shave that is almost a carbon copy but the blade is held in with a screw (i don't have it), it looks to be a better option. Just my 2 cents.
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#16
  Re: spokeshaves by clovishound (With my foray into s...)
I have that Lee Valley bevel up, and it's the only LV tool I own that I would not recommend.  The blade is held in place soley by friction of the clamping bolt heads pressing on it.  I've pushed it entirely out once, and kind of stopped using it after that.
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#17
  Re: spokeshaves by clovishound (With my foray into s...)
I have the LV shave, too.

I have had issues keeping the blade tight and in position.  The screw mechanism just doesn't work well for me.  I've always attributed that to my technique.
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#18
  Re: RE: spokeshaves by WxMan (I have the LV shave,...)
(01-03-2021, 11:22 AM)WxMan Wrote: I have the LV shave, too.

I have had issues keeping the blade tight and in position.  The screw mechanism just doesn't work well for me.  I've always attributed that to my technique.

......................
Tip from an old machinist.......to stop blade and or wedge slipping {on metal or wood}, get some ordinary rosin like that used on violin and stringed instrument bows, and with your pocketknife, scrape a small amount of rosin from the little block onto the contact surfaces.The slipping will cease to be!
Winkgrin ...Powdered rosin is also available. Friction can be your best friend...or your worst enemy.....you decide.....
Rolleyes
Winkgrin
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





Reply
#19
  Re: spokeshaves by clovishound (With my foray into s...)
I decided to spend a few minutes with the old spokeshave today. I wedged a small piece of wood in the keyhole and round filed it to a decent sized spacer. This helped a lot. It's still a little fiddly getting it adjusted, but I can get it about where I want it and then tighten the screw a little and everything stays in place pretty well. If I don't crank down on it too much I can still adjust it with a few hard raps on the bench.

It works, but I can't say it's a joy to use. A quality, thicker iron would help, but not sure if it would make it into a tool I am happy with, and then I'm out more money. I can afford a LV or LN but just can't justify the money on it right now. If the spoon carving turns out to be a long term interest, I will happily plunk down the money. I just don't want an expensive tool I rarely use in the shop. Not that it hasn't happened to me before. I'm wanting to pay off the new car I bought last fall before I retire later this year, so I'm in the frugal mode right now.

I'm tempted to get the Kunz round bottomed spokeshave for now. It's only $30 on Amazon and that model is still made in Germany. I will probably need a round bottomed one for concave surfaces anyway, although I'll still need a flat bottom one for most work. If it works well, I can then figure out whether I want to modify the sole to a hybrid flat/rounded shave, or figure out whether I want to try the newer made in China flat bottom model.
"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
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#20
  Re: spokeshaves by clovishound (With my foray into s...)
Hi all,

I have owned and used a bunch of different shaves over the years. Its one of the few tools I allow myself to own extras. I have that Lee Valley shave, and don't like it. The blade pops out when you get aggressive with green wood work. Not a fan.

Carry on.
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