Breadboard Ends
#21
  Re: RE: Breadboard Ends by Stwood_ ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(01-08-2021, 12:34 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: $12.00 HF furniture dolly?

Probably be better served by a plywood or sheetrock dolly so he can stand the table top through the doors longways.
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#22
  Re: RE: Breadboard Ends by DieselDennis ([quote='Stwood_' pid...)
(01-08-2021, 01:11 PM)DieselDennis Wrote: Probably be better served by a plywood or sheetrock dolly so he can stand the table top through the doors longways.

Have you ever seen one used on an upright piano? One in the middle.....
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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#23
  Re: RE: Breadboard Ends by Stwood_ ([quote='DieselDennis...)
Following up on how the ends are attached to the field, the traditional way is to glue and pin it at the center and to pin it with elongated holes at the outer tenons.  I would do that except I want to finish the ends separately.  Why?  Because the field is going to expand a lot while the ends won't, so a film finish will crack along the joint.  This happened with my friend's table a couple of years ago and it makes perfect sense.  So, I will finish the ends separately and then attach it.  I could still use the traditional way of attaching it, but I might not actually attach the ends until I put the top onto the base at the customer's house in order to keep the weight down.  In any case, I'm using Zipbolts to attach it.  To use them, you route a recess in the underside, drop them in, and tighten them with a 4 mm hex drive.  Here's one installed under the table top.  


 

There is plenty of side-to-side slop available for the field to expand/contract.  Assuming I wait until delivery day, I'll glue the center tenon as I install the ends, then tighten the Zipbolts.  They will be hidden from view by the base of the table, too, in case anyone looks underneath.  

Moving on to flushing the ends with the field I used a couple of hand planes and then sanded it.  That worked great on the bottom, and now I'm working on the top.  I have the ends flushed with the field now.




Now before I sand it I'm filling the cracks and holes with 5 minute epoxy with some Transtint Honey Amber dye.  




After the glue has cured I'll scrape them flush and then sand the entire top.  Which brings me to this challenge.  When I planed the boards I was trying to preserve as much thickness as possible.  I stopped at 1-1/4" but had this one small area in one board that's about 1/16" thinner.  




So, how would you deal with this? I don't want to plane/sand the entire top down that much.  But if I sand just that area there's going to be a 1/16" deep depression.  Is there a compromise where I can sand/plane it some and feather it out over a large enough area that it won't show?  

One more thing. I mentioned how well the boards lined up when I glued them up with biscuits for alignment.  Here's a shot of the worst mismatch.




A fingernail barely catches.  

John
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#24
  Re: Breadboard Ends by jteneyck (After spending most ...)
Low spot. Rip some thin (veneer thin) pieces and try to orient with the grain maybe.
Otherwise you are down to sanding and having the lowspot you don't want.

I'm afraid filler would be an eyesore, unless you have some colored stain pens to draw in some grain.
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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#25
  Re: Breadboard Ends by jteneyck (After spending most ...)
(01-06-2021, 08:52 PM)jteneyck Wrote: After spending most of the good months milling lumber I'm finally back in the shop using some of the lumber I cut and dried.  Currently, I'm making a dining room table with English walnut for the top and a painted maple base using some legs from Osborne.  As an aside, I ordered the legs on Monday and they arrived today.  Amazing.  And they are beautifully milled.  Anyway, I designed the table top with breadboard ends because I thought they looked good on a rustic style table and because the lumber wasn't long enough to give me the 96" long top as a simple glued up assembly.  I had never constructed bread board ends so I took a few photos of the process to share.  

After the top had been glued up I made a simple jig to support the router as I cut the tenons on the ends of the top.  I wanted the long tenons to be 2" so I set the fence accordingly and clamped it in place.  



The slab flattening bit I used did a great job for this task.  




The top is 1-1/4" thick so I made the rabbets just under 3/8" leaving the tenon just over 1/2" thick.  With the rabbets cut I laid out the tenons, then cut them with a hand saw and jigsaw.




I cleaned them up with a couple of planes and a file.




The center tenon is 4" wide and the two at the ends are 2-1/2".  The stub tenon is 3/4" and ends 1" from the ends.  

After prepping the breadboard ends which I left 1/16" thicker than the top, I transferred the tenon locations to them.  To allow for seasonal expansion I cut the center mortise about 1/8" wider and the outer mortises 1/4" wider on each side of the tenons.  Since the wood is at 6% moisture the top is going to expand but I still allowed room for contraction, just in case.  I cut the mortises with a 1/2" spiral upcut router bit using my horizontal router mortiser.  By adjusting the height of the router I was able to match the thickness of the tenons by flipping the workpiece with each pass over the bit, keeping the mortise centered.  First I cut the stub tenon across the full width of the ends, stopping at the transfer marks, and then I cut the deep mortises for the long tenons.  The mortises are 1/16" deeper than the tenons.  When done they looked like this.




I made a test piece before cutting the workpieces so I knew the mortise width would be very close, but I was still quite surprised when the pieces fit on the first try, maybe just a little snug on one but that will be remedied easily with the shoulder plane.  With the pieces test fit I marked the edges where they meet the field, then drum sanded both sides until just proud.  From here I'll bring them flush with the top with the ROS and maybe a hand plane.  





More to follow on how these will be held in place.  Thanks for looking.  

John

You are some piece of work John!  Oops! I meant to say that the table is some piece of work. I really appreciate the step by step view and explanation. Thanks.

--
See ya later,
Bill
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#26
  Re: RE: Breadboard Ends by jteneyck (Following up on how ...)
[quote pid='7940103' dateline='1610152536']

After the glue has cured I'll scrape them flush and then sand the entire top.  Which brings me to this challenge.  When I planed the boards I was trying to preserve as much thickness as possible.  I stopped at 1-1/4" but had this one small area in one board that's about 1/16" thinner.  



So, how would you deal with this? I don't want to plane/sand the entire top down that much.  But if I sand just that area there's going to be a 1/16" deep depression.  Is there a compromise where I can sand/plane it some and feather it out over a large enough area that it won't show?  



A fingernail barely catches.  

John
[/quote]

I'm finishing a 44" round top right now.  Also used biscuits, also had a tiny bit of difference in a couple places when I put the four pieces together.  I glued (Super 77) a full sheet of 100 grit sandpaper to a slab of MDF and used that to 'flatten' the top so I was covering a lot of area at one time, followed by regular ROS and finish sanding.  My straight edge says it's dead flat, and I don't see or feel anything different.   For what it's worth...
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#27
  Re: RE: Breadboard Ends by Stwood_ (Low spot. Rip some t...)
(01-08-2021, 07:44 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: Low spot. Rip some thin (veneer thin) pieces and try to orient with the grain maybe.
Otherwise you are down to sanding and having the lowspot you don't want.

I'm afraid filler would be an eyesore, unless you have some colored stain pens to draw in some grain.

Thanks.  That was the motivation I needed to pursue that approach.  The obvious but not quick solution is usually the best.  Stay tuned.  

John
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#28
  Re: Breadboard Ends by jteneyck (After spending most ...)
Looking good, never thought about that method of attaching the bread board ends, nice and clean.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
20 year cancer survivor
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#29
  Re: Breadboard Ends by jteneyck (After spending most ...)
About the 1/16th depression: When buying a leather couch, the pamphlet says all natural leather has imperfections. That applies to woodworking too. If it’s not made of plywood/veneer, there may be a low spot here and there. So be it. It is still and hand-crafted and quality table.
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#30
  Re: Breadboard Ends by jteneyck (After spending most ...)
Looks great John. This table brings back memories of my table build. Many similarities. I used Glen Huey’s breadboard ends technique with draw bored homemade walnut dowels.

I sprayed a couple light coats of TT dark walnut on my table to even out the reds and chocolate browns in the walnut boards. Seal coat shellac then GF clear poly. I think the table is pushing 5 years old now and the finish has held up very well. I took the easy route on the legs with Zinsser, BM Advance, and GF high perf. No regrets going that route for a white finish either. Thanks for taking the time to post.


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