Cut resistant gloves
#10
  
Another thread inspired by my foray into spoon carving.

After going through a box of bandaids, I decided it's time to look at some cut resistant gloves. Actually, I've only had a couple of minor cuts, but I see the handwriting in blood on the shop wall.

I've tried doing some research online, and thought I would ask what some of you are using out there. There is a dizzying selection of them available online, but it looks like a lot of them are so similar that it makes little difference which manufacturer I choose in that type. For me it comes down to a couple choices. This is what I see available.

1. Chain mail.     These seem like they would be a bit much for what I am doing. They are expensive and look like they would reduce dexterity too much. I will give these a pass.

2. Coated fabric.   They come with a variety of materials for both the fabric and the coating. Some are dipped, and some have dots.

3. Uncoated fabric. These also come with a variety of materials for the fabric.

As to the fabric, I see HPPE, nylon, polyethylene and perhaps a few others. Some include glass fibers and  a few even have stainless steel wire incorporated into the yarn. Some of the reviews complain that the SS wire sometimes breaks and then pokes through the fabric.

Most all are rated at A4, and yet claim level 5 protection. Apparently the European rating is different, and the ANSI rating is considered superior. Not sure there is enough difference to warrant my finding the less common ANSI level 5 gloves.

A few local stores handle these gloves, although the selection is much more limited. The big advantage is I can try on a pair before buying, and be sure of the fit. HD land Wally World both carry them locally at a competitive price and I am tempted to try one or the other.

Perhaps I am overthinking this whole thing (who would have thought), and I just need to go buy a pair and be done with it. Anyway, what are your experiences?

Wamarts offering:
[Image: e7e9a278-39c5-4dac-bf98-52c782dd1299_2.8...nBg=ffffff]

Home Depot's:
[Image: hdx-work-gloves-hdx37217-l-xl-64_1000.jpg]
"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
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#11
  Re: Cut resistant gloves by clovishound (Another thread inspi...)
(01-13-2021, 12:31 PM)clovishound Wrote: Another thread inspired by my foray into spoon carving.

After going through a box of bandaids, I decided it's time to look at some cut resistant gloves. Actually, I've only had a couple of minor cuts, but I see the handwriting in blood on the shop wall.
What you show looks like stuff for making firewood or building houses in the rain. Carving usually requires more finesse. The actual carving blogs will probably comment on appropriate protection. Just do a search within their sites. 
What I have found is guidance to aramid (ballistic fibers) Kevlar, and individual finger tape; the same stuff medical people use. Stretchy, self-stick, waffley-looking stuff. Neither of these have much resistance to stabbing but you aren't looking to join the Three Musketeers.
Heirlooms are self-important fiction so build what you like. Someone may find it useful.
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#12
  Re: Cut resistant gloves by clovishound (Another thread inspi...)
(01-13-2021, 12:31 PM)clovishound Wrote: Another thread inspired by my foray into spoon carving.

After going through a box of bandaids, I decided it's time to look at some cut resistant gloves. Actually, I've only had a couple of minor cuts, but I see the handwriting in blood on the shop wall.

I've tried doing some research online, and thought I would ask what some of you are using out there. There is a dizzying selection of them available online, but it looks like a lot of them are so similar that it makes little difference which manufacturer I choose in that type. For me it comes down to a couple choices. This is what I see available.

1. Chain mail.     These seem like they would be a bit much for what I am doing. They are expensive and look like they would reduce dexterity too much. I will give these a pass.

2. Coated fabric.   They come with a variety of materials for both the fabric and the coating. Some are dipped, and some have dots.

3. Uncoated fabric. These also come with a variety of materials for the fabric.

As to the fabric, I see HPPE, nylon, polyethylene and perhaps a few others. Some include glass fibers and  a few even have stainless steel wire incorporated into the yarn. Some of the reviews complain that the SS wire sometimes breaks and then pokes through the fabric.

Most all are rated at A4, and yet claim level 5 protection. Apparently the European rating is different, and the ANSI rating is considered superior. Not sure there is enough difference to warrant my finding the less common ANSI level 5 gloves.

A few local stores handle these gloves, although the selection is much more limited. The big advantage is I can try on a pair before buying, and be sure of the fit. HD land Wally World both carry them locally at a competitive price and I am tempted to try one or the other.

Perhaps I am overthinking this whole thing (who would have thought), and I just need to go buy a pair and be done with it. Anyway, what are your experiences?

Wamarts offering:
[Image: e7e9a278-39c5-4dac-bf98-52c782dd1299_2.8...nBg=ffffff]

Home Depot's:
[Image: hdx-work-gloves-hdx37217-l-xl-64_1000.jpg]
............................
I have two, both sold as carving gloves from Woodcraft and both Kevlar..Priced at about 25 bucks each when I bought them..I sometimes wear one on the left hand but not very often..they don't feel very comfortable..I very seldom cut myself because I have learned how to "hold back"
and at he same time, push the blade forward..The carving gloves are really only effective against slicing cuts...not "stab cuts"...

Worse cut I ever got accidentally was with my pocketknife attempting to cut a vine Sliced the top of my thumb, and requiring a trip to the emergency room...Almost cut the tendon...10stitches to close it. Upset
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#13
  Re: Cut resistant gloves by clovishound (Another thread inspi...)
Cut resistant gloves from an outlet like Bass Pro Shops or Cabelas are half the price of the same mesh gloves sold as carver's gloves at woodworking stores. They are used when fileting fish. I can attest that they do work.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#14
  Re: RE: Cut resistant gloves by AHill (Cut resistant gloves...)
(01-13-2021, 01:24 PM)AHill Wrote: Cut resistant gloves from an outlet like Bass Pro Shops or Cabelas are half the price of the same mesh gloves sold as carver's gloves at woodworking stores.  They are used when fileting fish.  I can attest that they do work.
.................
I'll have to check them out next trip to Bass pro....I just checked one of mine...No metal...all kevlar


"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#15
  Re: Cut resistant gloves by clovishound (Another thread inspi...)
The research I have done says that HPPE is far superior than kevlar for this application. It is stronger and more cut/abrasion resistant than kevlar, and does not degrade substantially from washing or UV light. Kevlar loses 15% of it's strength after just 6 washings. 

I just noticed that HD has some coated gloves with an ANSI 5 rating. I may have to look at those. 

[Image: 85060_400x400.jpg]

I am getting better at not cutting myself. I have not drawn blood for the last couple of spoons carved. I still believe I need to start wearing one of these gloves, at least on my left hand.
"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
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#16
  Re: RE: Cut resistant gloves by clovishound (The research I have ...)
(01-13-2021, 05:02 PM)clovishound Wrote: I am getting better at not cutting myself. I have not drawn blood for the last couple of spoons carved. I still believe I need to start wearing one of these gloves, at least on my left hand.

Time to make the shave horse and forget about gloves. Don't need 'em when wooden hands are holding the work. 

Or just a "shave pony".  I used to provide something similar for carving class attendees. RWW 164 Shave Pony - Bing video

Simple "plan" https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=...ajaxhist=0

Believe FWW calls it the same, if you have access. Don't need a full swing footbrace. Rope with a rung allows you to hold well, too.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#17
  Re: Cut resistant gloves by clovishound (Another thread inspi...)
Well, I've been using a clamp, a piece of scrap wood and a corner of my workbench to clamp down the spoons as I work on them. There are certain operations that it is just downright inconvenient to work on clamped. I have given some thought to making a spoon mule.
"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
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#18
  Re: RE: Cut resistant gloves by clovishound (Well, I've been usin...)
(01-14-2021, 11:39 AM)clovishound Wrote: Well, I've been using a clamp, a piece of scrap wood and a corner of my workbench to clamp down the spoons as I work on them. There are certain operations that it is just downright inconvenient to work on clamped. I have given some thought to making a spoon mule.

.......................
Two things....Have you tried a knife with an "up-swept" edge?? They can be very handy when a blade with a straight edge just isn't working right for you...

Have you considered making a "hold-down" using a leather strap that holds the work in a "V" block at the correct height and operated with your left foot?......Just some rambling thoughts...
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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