Dining room table from Dim. lumber
#5
  
I am building a farmhouse table from dimensional lumber 2x4’s and 2x6’s

Finishing is a weak area for me.
I am planning on using some water based wood conditioner, probably a minwax product. Then some kind of clear or colored stain.

Do I need some final layer for safety since we are going to eat on it?
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#6
  Re: Dining room table from Dim. lumber by ShopSquirrel (I am building a farm...)
(01-31-2021, 04:03 AM)ShopSquirrel Wrote: I am building a farmhouse table from dimensional lumber 2x4’s and 2x6’s

Finishing is a weak area for me.
I am planning on using some water based wood conditioner, probably a minwax product. Then some kind of clear or colored stain.

Do I need some final layer for safety since we are going to eat on it?

If you are going to use construction lumber be aware that it won't be dry enough for furniture use, so after you buy it sticker it in your shop for a month or two until it's truly dry.  Dry means 6 - 8% moisture.  That will eliminate a lot of heartache instead of using it right away.  

Any stain you put on pine/fir/spruce, etc. is going to blotch.  Wood conditioner might help some, but they better approach is to use a spray no wipe stain or dewaxed shellac with whatever color dye in it that gives you the color you want.  Third best would be to use a gel stain over a sealed surface.  In any case, after you have applied the color you definitely want to apply a varnish of some type in order for it to survive very long.  If you use oil based stain then it would be best to use an oil based varnish.  If you use a water based stain then you would use a water based varnish.  

John
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#7
  Re: Dining room table from Dim. lumber by ShopSquirrel (I am building a farm...)
I agree with jteneyck regarding acclimating the lumber before use. I would add that you should stack 20-25% extra to allow for warping, twisting, and bowing as it dries. You will likely end up with some that is unusable for your project.

Dimension lumber is certainly blotch prone. I have had good success using clear danish oil for a first coat on blotch prone wood. I then allow it to dry only about 8 hours before applying an oil based gel stain. I then allow both of those to dry completely (maybe 48 hours) before adding my finish coats (usually poly). This process may not be perfect at eliminating blotch, but it certainly minimizes it. I suggest that you try it on some scrap and see how it does for you.
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#8
  Re: Dining room table from Dim. lumber by ShopSquirrel (I am building a farm...)
You can't get the lumber down to 8% without either putting in a kiln or prolonged acclimation in a climate controlled room, preferably with a dehumidifier.
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