Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat
#11
  
I'm going to build a table top lazy susan that will be fairly large out of oak. It will be circular. I had originally thought about doing some type of breadboard ends to keep it flat, but then I realized that the movement would change the width of boards compared to the length.

Other than cutting the boards into narrower pieces and flipping their orientation, what would be a good way to keep it flat? Making it out of four sections that are mitered together? The customer wants to paint and distress it.
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#12
  Re: Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat by lincmercguy (I'm going to build a...)
Battens on the underside?
Thanks,  Curt
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#13
  Re: Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat by lincmercguy (I'm going to build a...)
"Battens on the underside?"

I think they would have to be too thick to do any good. But maybe that combined with narrow alternating grain orientation boards?
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#14
  Re: Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat by lincmercguy (I'm going to build a...)
Can you use quarter-sawn white oak?
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#15
  Re: Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat by lincmercguy (I'm going to build a...)
"Can you use quarter-sawn white oak?"

I could use QSRO, but not for what I'm charging. If I was going to finish it to leave a wood finish, I would.
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#16
  Re: Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat by lincmercguy (I'm going to build a...)
Dimensions?

Based on your description, it's not going to be attached to the table.  It's going to be painted, so why oak?  is that just what you have on hand?

I was thinking about mitered sections, but eight sections, not four.  But that's a lot of fussy work, for that piece.

Another thought: since it's going to be painted, you could have more than just a couple of boards glued together.  I would think think that more strips of narrower width would give you some protection against cupping, particularly if you avoid pieces that are too far off the quartersawn orientation.
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#17
  Re: Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat by lincmercguy (I'm going to build a...)
... if you are going to paint it .... just use banded plywood ....
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#18
  Re: RE: Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat by Red Sawman (... if you are going...)
(02-04-2021, 10:34 AM)Red Sawman Wrote: ... if you are going to paint it .... just use banded plywood ....

^^^^^^  Baltic birch with edge banding.  

John
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#19
  Re: RE: Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat by jteneyck ([quote='Red Sawman' ...)
(02-04-2021, 10:34 AM)Red Sawman Wrote: ... if you are going to paint it .... just use banded plywood ....

(02-04-2021, 05:20 PM)jteneyck Wrote: ^^^^^^  Baltic birch with edge banding.  

John

+1
Steve

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The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
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#20
  Re: Keeping Lazy Susan Top Flat by lincmercguy (I'm going to build a...)
If you are going to paint it, Oak is the harder choice. The grain is so open you’ll need to use a filler to get any sort of smooth finish.
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