Kitchen cabinet question
#7
  
Well howdy folks. I guess my account got deleted from here because I haven’t been on in a while. I no longer have access to my full shop of tools after a divorce years ago but I’m looking to see how you guys might tackle this. I want to cut out this cover and turn it into a sliding rack for kitchen utensils. Obviously it wouldn’t take much to replace that piece so if I destroy it, it’s not a big deal. However I want to be sure I don’t damage the cabinets on either side. Again, limited tools so help me brainstorm. Thanks all.


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#8
  Re: Kitchen cabinet question by Ephmynus2 (Well howdy folks. I ...)
It’s completely void inside.


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#9
  Re: RE: Kitchen cabinet question by Ephmynus2 (It’s completely void...)
That's a filler piece.  They normally are just screwed in place from the faceframes on each side.  Remove those screws and it should come out.  However, before you do that, make sure the cabinet on each side is adequately and independently supported to the wall, and that the filler isn't helping support one of the cabinets.  Once the filler is out you can build a new cabinet for the sliding rack.  That can be a pretty simple affair, easily done using sheet goods and basic tools.  The filler would become the door for the cabinet, attached to the sliding rack hardware.  It would need to be trimmed slightly to fit in between the adjacent cabinets; a hand plane would do that. 

John
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#10
  Re: RE: Kitchen cabinet question by jteneyck (That's a filler piec...)
(02-10-2021, 07:17 PM)jteneyck Wrote: That's a filler piece.  They normally are just screwed in place from the faceframes on each side.  Remove those screws and it should come out.  However, before you do that, make sure the cabinet on each side is adequately and independently supported to the wall, and that the filler isn't helping support one of the cabinets.  Once the filler is out you can build a new cabinet for the sliding rack.  That can be a pretty simple affair, easily done using sheet goods and basic tools.  The filler would become the door for the cabinet, attached to the sliding rack hardware.  It would need to be trimmed slightly to fit in between the adjacent cabinets; a hand plane would do that. 

John

+1
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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#11
  Re: Kitchen cabinet question by Ephmynus2 (Well howdy folks. I ...)
Thanks so much. I’ve never done cabinets so I figured that was glued. But once I saw your reply I immediately found the screws. I certainly appreciate your thoughtful response.
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#12
  Re: Kitchen cabinet question by Ephmynus2 (Well howdy folks. I ...)
Most installers are not cabinet makers.  They can trim and screw.  

As mentioned above, some are hacks and are trying to get done as quickly as possible.  Shortcuts are often taken.  So do check to see that there are two screws (minimum) holding the cabinet to the wall at the top.  If it is an Ikea cabinet, they use a bracket, so it is harder to tell how well it is attached.

Try to preserve the filler.  You might want to use it as a face of the pull-out.
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