Wood trim technique question
#9
  
Hi,
I am making a headboard for my daughter, the base of the headboard will be 3/4 baltic birch plywood, and she wants 3/4 pine strips glued and nailed in geometric designs.  As i layout the geometric designs, many of the pine strips overhang the edge of the Plywood.  What would i do to trim those pine overhangs so they match up with the plywood edge, so i can add a nice finished frame around the outer edge?  I though about using a flush trim router bit but there will be so many pieces to cut was wondering if there is another way?

Thanks
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#10
  Re: Wood trim technique question by danwas44 (Hi, I am making a h...)
(02-26-2021, 09:58 AM)danwas44 Wrote: Hi,
I am making a headboard for my daughter, the base of the headboard will be 3/4 baltic birch plywood, and she wants 3/4 pine strips glued and nailed in geometric designs.  As i layout the geometric designs, many of the pine strips overhang the edge of the Plywood.  What would i do to trim those pine overhangs so they match up with the plywood edge, so i can add a nice finished frame around the outer edge?  I though about using a flush trim router bit but there will be so many pieces to cut was wondering if there is another way?

Thanks

  Actually, once you set up the flush trim router bit, it'd be the fastest and easiest IMHO.  My second choice would be a flush cut Japanese pull saw.  It'd probably take a lot longer and be more labor involved, but it'd work fine.  The router bit would have to have a backer board clamped to the pine to prevent tear-out but that shouldn't be too difficult.

HTH,

Joel
USN (Corpsman) 1968-1972
USAF Retired Aug 31, 1994
Santa Rosa County, Fl Retired Jun 1, 2012
Now just a hobbiest enjoying woodworking!
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#11
  Re: Wood trim technique question by danwas44 (Hi, I am making a h...)
Plus 1 on the flush trim router bit
....the measure of a man is not what he does when others are around, it is what he does when no one is around.....
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#12
  Re: RE: Wood trim technique question by MT Woodworker (Plus 1 on the flush ...)
You might consider leaving the plywood slightly oversized, adding your pine pieces, also oversized, and then cutting everything to final size at once.  

John
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#13
  Re: RE: Wood trim technique question by Joel H. ([quote='danwas44' pi...)
(02-26-2021, 11:17 AM)Joel H. Wrote:   Actually, once you set up the flush trim router bit, it'd be the fastest and easiest IMHO.  My second choice would be a flush cut Japanese pull saw.  It'd probably take a lot longer and be more labor involved, but it'd work fine.  The router bit would have to have a backer board clamped to the pine to prevent tear-out but that shouldn't be too difficult.

HTH,

Joel

Thanks Joel, I actually have a Japanese pull saw and had considered that too.  I guess I'll go for the router bit.  When you say a backer board, are you saying another piece of pine clamped along the entire edge on top of the pine strips?
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#14
  Re: RE: Wood trim technique question by jteneyck (You might consider l...)
(02-26-2021, 02:31 PM)jteneyck Wrote: You might consider leaving the plywood slightly oversized, adding your pine pieces, also oversized, and then cutting everything to final size at once.  

John

John, 

That's a really good idea too.  I think I'm going to experiment with that as the flush trim router bit would make a mess with some many pine strips.  

Thanks all!
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#15
  Re: RE: Wood trim technique question by danwas44 ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(02-26-2021, 04:28 PM)danwas44 Wrote: John, 

That's a really good idea too.  I think I'm going to experiment with that as the flush trim router bit would make a mess with some many pine strips.  

Thanks all!

I agree with John's idea - hadn't occurred to me.  Always has good advice. Edit: If you do this, I wouldn't extend the pine pieces beyond the plywood so you can use the plywood edge to make a straight cut.

But to answer your question: not the entire length of the pine boards, Just long enough to clamp securely so when the bit exits the pine it doesn't tear out the last part.

Joel
USN (Corpsman) 1968-1972
USAF Retired Aug 31, 1994
Santa Rosa County, Fl Retired Jun 1, 2012
Now just a hobbiest enjoying woodworking!
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#16
  Re: Wood trim technique question by danwas44 (Hi, I am making a h...)
I'll second John's advice and yes, he does usually have good advice. A flush trim saw wouldn't have much of a reference edge, and the trim router bit might have a hard time as well depending on how far the geometric strips overhang. They aren't really designed to cut through wood, though some of them can.

Oversize the plywood and then cut everything at once with a track saw or a circular saw with a guide. You're guaranteed a pretty smooth edge and if you go slow with a good blade tearout will be minimal.
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