240V electrical question
#30
  Re: RE: 240V electrical question by Admiral (Fr. Peter:  not tryi...)
(03-05-2021, 03:30 PM)Admiral Wrote: Fr. Peter:  not trying to be snarky or irreverent, but don't you have a parishioner who is an electrician looking for some indulgence credits??  Smile   Sorry, I had to ask . . . . Smile

Laugh

No worries.

My situation has changed since I was first ordained and working in a parish.  I spent two years teaching at a catholic high school and now the last five years at a private university as the catholic campus minister.  My shop is actually in an unused space on the campus and not at the friary.  The university has been very generous towards me.

This question doesn't really apply at this moment... but if I were to ever upgrade my thickness planer (probably the next tool to be upgraded) from my DW 733 I would really want a helical head.

so my logic went like this.

1) I could get something like a DW 735 and upgrade the cutter 

2) or I could get a 15" planer (maybe used) and upgrade that head and have more planer

I have no idea where and when religious life will take me to next so I don't know what my shop space will look like and I just can't expect to upgrade the wiring.

That's why I was asking about this strange wiring setup.  It was more "what could be" in the future rather than problem solving the present.
Peter

My "day job"
Reply
#31
  Re: 240V electrical question by Peter Tremblay (I'm not in a positio...)
"I could get something like a DW 735 and upgrade the cutter "

I did this and got the Grizzly head and have been happy. It still requires sanding, but is faster and I can actually plane curly maple easily now, I used to hate the stuff. Just remember this planer weights 90lbs, so you're not going to keep it on a shelf and bring it out when needed.

I thought about upgrading before I upgraded the head. Anything I found that was wider was 240V.
Project Blog Got it all up-to-date, and I promise to keep it up-to-date.
Reply
#32
  Re: RE: 240V electrical question by Peter Tremblay ([quote='Admiral' pid...)
(03-09-2021, 12:51 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: Laugh

No worries.

My situation has changed since I was first ordained and working in a parish.  I spent two years teaching at a catholic high school and now the last five years at a private university as the catholic campus minister.  My shop is actually in an unused space on the campus and not at the friary.  The university has been very generous towards me.

This question doesn't really apply at this moment... but if I were to ever upgrade my thickness planer (probably the next tool to be upgraded) from my DW 733 I would really want a helical head.

so my logic went like this.

1) I could get something like a DW 735 and upgrade the cutter 

2) or I could get a 15" planer (maybe used) and upgrade that head and have more planer

I have no idea where and when religious life will take me to next so I don't know what my shop space will look like and I just can't expect to upgrade the wiring.

That's why I was asking about this strange wiring setup.  It was more "what could be" in the future rather than problem solving the present.


I don't have any experience with it, but there's been some buzz about this Oliver planer recently.  It would be a compromise for you but give you most of what you want using 110 voltage, and for less $ than upgrading a 735.  Michael

https://www.toolboxbuzz.com/power-tools/...44-planer/
Reply
#33
  Re: RE: 240V electrical question by Baumholder ([quote='Peter Trembl...)
(03-10-2021, 05:32 AM)Baumholder Wrote: I don't have any experience with it, but there's been some buzz about this Oliver planer recently.  It would be a compromise for you but give you most of what you want using 110 voltage, and for less $ than upgrading a 735.  Michael

https://www.toolboxbuzz.com/power-tools/...44-planer/

Great link!

Thanks

I didn't even know about that machine.

My current machine is a 12.5" model so upgrading to a 15" isn't actually all that much.  2.5" isn't a big deal in the grand scheme of things.  I just want my next planer to be my last and I want shelix cutter heads.

I move often enough so the light weight is a plus and it is 120V simplifies my life a lot.

Thanks again.  I'll keep this machine in mind.
Peter

My "day job"
Reply
#34
  Re: 240V electrical question by Peter Tremblay (I'm not in a positio...)
If you have access to the power panel, and the tools are not that far away, it is a fairly simple task to wire a 240v outlet.  I'm an engineer, so it's not daunting for me, but it wouldn't be that expensive to hire a licensed electrician for the job.  Just make sure the outlet matches the plug.  Most 220v power tools don't come with a cord - you will need to solve that issue as well.  You can save some money buy purchasing the hardware and wire at a big box store.  Most of the big box stores also have books like wiring for dummies.  Power tool outlets and cords are usually NOT the same as for household appliances like electric ovens or dryers.  Search the forum and there are probably a few threads on the subject.

You will also want to consult your landlord before you do this.  There are liability issues if you do it yourself and you end up not doing it to code.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
Reply
#35
  Re: RE: 240V electrical question by Peter Tremblay ([quote='Admiral' pid...)
(03-09-2021, 12:51 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: Laugh

No worries.

My situation has changed since I was first ordained and working in a parish.  I spent two years teaching at a catholic high school and now the last five years at a private university as the catholic campus minister.  My shop is actually in an unused space on the campus and not at the friary.  The university has been very generous towards me.

Ah, got it.  My niece is an Elon alumnae, went to her graduation, beautiful campus. I'm sure you enjoy your work there.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
Reply
#36
  Re: 240V electrical question by Peter Tremblay (I'm not in a positio...)
(03-04-2021, 12:19 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: I'm not in a position to do this at the moment but I am curious.  My access to shop space is usually limited, especially when it comes to electricity.  So right now all my tools are 120V.

If I ever got a 240V tool (possibly a thickness planer) could I power it using a regular wall plug and a small gas generator together.

Here's my reason for wondering if this would work. I know that a 240V plug is two 120V hot lines, one negative line, and a ground.  Could I wire a plug to take a hot from the wall outlet, a hot from the gas generator, and either the negative back to the wall or splice it where the negative goes to the wall and the generator?  While finally having the ground go to the wall outlet?

I know that this isn't up to code.  I was thinking that if this was safe then It is fairly easy to run two extension cords to a box or plug.  Plug in the two lines, one to the 120V wall socket and one to the 120V running gas generator.  When done unplug everything and put the cords away.

I know that this is probably a long shot but I just wanted to ask.

Thanks
Reply
#37
  Re: 240V electrical question by Peter Tremblay (I'm not in a positio...)
Peter,

Do not attempt this, get an electrician.  Craziest idea I've heard in a long time.
Reply
#38
  Re: RE: 240V electrical question by Danny in Houston (Peter, Do not att...)
(03-14-2021, 12:29 PM)Danny in Houston Wrote: Peter,

Do not attempt this, get an electrician.  Craziest idea I've heard in a long time.

Plus 1
Get an electrician.....
....the measure of a man is not what he does when others are around, it is what he does when no one is around.....
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.