New circular saw burning the wood
#16
  Re: RE: New circular saw burning the wood by Cooler (Is this an all steel...)
(03-11-2021, 08:37 AM)Cooler Wrote: Is this an all steel blade or a carbide tipped?  The carbide tipped blades cut a wider slot than the steel portion of the blade and  is less likely to bind.

I believe it's carbide, but the writing on it blurred pretty significantly. As far as I can tell it's this one https://www.lowes.com/pd/CRAFTSMAN-CFT-6...5000184485
Reply
#17
  Re: New circular saw burning the wood by katlorine (Hello! I am a rel...)
Pressure treated wood is always wet and hard to rip, blade pinch, cross cutting not so bad. I built a archery back stop 2 years ago using 2 vertical 6" x 6" x 10ft treated posts set 2ft into the ground. I thought that would be sturdy enough. Ended up putting 2 4" x 4" x 8ft diagonal braces to the ground to make the back stop stiff enough. I hung a Morrell Outdoor range bag target from the top so the center of the target is about 3ft off the ground. I put a roof over it to keep the weather off of it.
Treat others as you want to be treated.

“ You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” — Mae West.
20 year cancer survivor
Reply
#18
  Re: RE: New circular saw burning the wood by katlorine ([quote='AHill' pid='...)
(03-11-2021, 10:02 AM)katlorine Wrote: Oh! Would this apply to weather treated wood? I am building an archery backdrop for my fiancee, so I made sure to get wood that could hold up outdoors. I didn't know you would sometimes need to wait that long between buying materials and using them, is that common?

Pressure treated wood is generally even more moisture laden than regular dimensional construction lumber.  The problem now is that if you let the pressure treated lumber dry, it will likely warp and twist into shapes, unrecognizable as the board you originally bought.  It's generally recommended with pressure treated lumber, to get it cut and secured in whatever you are building before it dries, so that you have some hope of it staying put.

I agree that it's likely that the wood is pinching the blade while you are cutting.  It's even more likely being pressure treated.  A good carbide blade will help, but it won't prevent the problem, under those circumstances.  BTW, you can tell if the blade is carbide by looking at the tips of the teeth.  If they have a small piece if metal attached to each tooth tip, then it's carbide.  Something like this...


If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

http://blazinbladesscrollers.webs.com/
Reply
#19
  Re: New circular saw burning the wood by katlorine (Hello! I am a rel...)
Just guessing---are you trying to make the cuts with the cut/saw between two sawhorses/supports? That will cause blade pinch/burning big time. Proper cutting means the off cut is not supported(falls away).

You need a blade marked for cross cut with only about 18 or less teeth.
Reply
#20
  Re: RE: New circular saw burning the wood by katlorine ([quote='AHill' pid='...)
(03-11-2021, 10:02 AM)katlorine Wrote: Oh! Would this apply to weather treated wood? I am building an archery backdrop for my fiancee, so I made sure to get wood that could hold up outdoors. I didn't know you would sometimes need to wait that long between buying materials and using them, is that common?

AHill was referring to wood for furniture making. No one acclimatizes dimensional lumber for months before using it, at least no one I know of.

And yes even the world's dullest new blade is sharp before it's used. Wood pinching or the (too many) # of teeth is the common reason for your observation.

Simon
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.