Dividers
#28
  Re: RE: Dividers by Handplanesandmore ([quote='Pedder' pid=...)
(04-05-2021, 01:38 PM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: Nice hammer? Yes.

Art?! No way.

Simon
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Maybe not "fine" art, but certainly "fine" craft.. Winkgrin I would prefer they be made out of O1 tool steel rather than "free machining" steel..altho I am sure the price would be higher... and I am not sure about the use of teflon washers...it provides lubricity but my experience with it in the repair of hydraulic pumps, is it can compress and cold flow..and require more frequent adjustment. I am pretty sure tho, that they took that into consideration when they chose it....it appears to be a fine tool...
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#29
  Re: Dividers by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, Recent...)
Just to add a bit of color commentary to this thread.

I think it is an exceptionally good thing that these types of boutique tools are being made and seem to be selling.

I'm of the opinion that fine tools, especially beautiful tools, do improve the quality of my work.  That might be a negative commentary on the quality of my work but I'm fine with that.  Beautiful tools inspire me.

But just as a overall comment on our hobby.  It has almost always been the boutique manufacturers who have made our hobby of hand tool woodworking grow and improve. 

I remember when Lie Nielsen was one of the first to release a good western style dovetail saw.  Then shortly after we had boutique makers expand the market.  Now we have multiple options for fantastic backsaws at a variety of price points.  The hobby is better off because of the boutique and high end tool makers.

The same goes for (infill) hand planes, and chisels, and vises, and just about every other tool that we use in the shop.  Our hobby is just better because of the boutique tool makers and those who buy these tools.

If I were living a different life I would own a bunch of Bontz saws, Brese planes, and Blue Spruce chisels (just to name a few).  I do have a full set of Barr Chisels that I LOVE Big Grin  But you get the point.

I am convinced that these toolmakers (who often struggle to make a living out of it) make almost everything about our hobby (save for the actual wood itself) better.  That and I haven't even mentioned those like Chris Schwartz who have added invaluable wisdom, research, and beautiful quality books and written materials to teach us how to use those tools.

When I consider these tool makers and writers I am nothing but deeply grateful for their creativity, craftsmanship, and talent.  Their work has immeasurably enriched my life.  I am a better person for what they have done.  I've met many of them and I consider them to be some of the finest, nicest, and admirable humans that I have ever met. 

So while my woodworking budget doesn't allow for a $200 pair of dividers or an $85 hammer I sure hope they sell like crazy and keep moving our hobby forward.

I'll get off of my soapbox now. Wink
Peter

My "day job"
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#30
  Re: Dividers by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, Recent...)
(04-06-2021, 10:42 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: I remember when Lie Nielsen was one of the first to release a good western style dovetail saw.

(who often struggle to make a living out of it)


TLN bought the Independet Saw from Pete Taran and Patrick Leach. But Independent was the first western saw maker after WWII who didn't search for a cheaper but for a better saw.

I would struggle, oh would I struggle!


Cheers
Pedder
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#31
  Re: RE: Dividers by Pedder ([quote='Peter Trembl...)
Pete Taran is making saws again under the Ne Plus Ultra moniker.  Christopher Schwarz gave him a mention in his blog.  I warn you.  These saws are not cheap.

http://www.vintagesaws.com/catalog/index...1lv2ncini5
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#32
  Re: Dividers by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, Recent...)
I think the Crucible tools are intended not only as boutique tools, but to offer some function difficult to find elsewhere. The Crucible dividers can be set to provide just the right amount of friction so they can be adjusted but tend to keep their setting. This allows them to do away with locking down and screw adjustment mechanisms. I've never been bothered by any problems using old $10 Starrett dividers (MWTCA), but for those who are, or who have not been able to find them, Crucible is a quality option.

The other Crucible tools also fill a niche. If you think other options fall short, they are worth investigating.
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#33
  Re: RE: Dividers by Alan S (I think the Crucible...)
(04-08-2021, 02:37 PM)Alan S Wrote: I think the Crucible tools are intended not only as boutique tools, but to offer some function difficult to find elsewhere.  The Crucible dividers can be set to provide just the right amount of friction so they can be adjusted but tend to keep their setting.  This allows them to do away with locking down and screw adjustment mechanisms.  I've never been bothered by any problems using old $10 Starrett dividers (MWTCA), but for those who are, or who have not been able to find them, Crucible is a quality option.

The other Crucible tools also fill a niche.  If you think other options fall short, they are worth investigating.
.......................
This allows them to do away with locking down and screw adjustment mechanisms

My thoughts after further consideration..

The dividers that you CAN lock are not apt to ever be accidentally knocked out of adjustment, unlike the older firm joints when they get really old or worn..additionally, when the joint is REALLY firm, they can be a PITA to creep up on and set to an exact measurement...The teflon washer is supposed to cure that problem......They are "free machining steel"..which is easier for the maker to machine and get a good finish on...unlike tools made of hardened and tempered "tool steel"..and as I mentioned earlier, the teflon washer has a tendency to "cold flow" when much pressure is applied to it over a period of time, making an adjustment necessary..and eventually having to replace the washer...I like teflon, but it does have limitations..and maybe the maker has solved this one by "capturing" the washer in a machined groove inside the joint..... I have had some really old firm joint lay out tools that took lots of strength to open or close them.

Starrett and other toolmakers offer a similar divider that has a large, round and serrated "nut" with which you can loosen or lock the joint in position very securely to tighten the legs, and it has a "fine adjustment" feature...priced new about the same as the one we are critiquing. I have a few of that style I snagged at flea markets and tool meets.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#34
  Re: RE: Dividers by Peter Tremblay (Just to add a bit of...)
(04-06-2021, 10:42 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: Just to add a bit of color commentary to this thread.

I think it is an exceptionally good thing that these types of boutique tools are being made and seem to be selling.

I'm of the opinion that fine tools, especially beautiful tools, do improve the quality of my work.  That might be a negative commentary on the quality of my work but I'm fine with that.  Beautiful tools inspire me...

Well said, Peter.  I have the same sentiments.
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