Post Frame House/Barndominium ???
#6
  
So I'm intrigued by these things I see on YT and the web in general. Relatively low cost for a larger space.
Everything can be on one level, so that's conducive to aging knees.
So what's not to like?

I'm not a fan of concrete flooring, but there are floor covering options to make that much less of a concern in terms of comfort and knees.

Plumbing drains running under the floating slab are difficult to get to if repairs are needed, but water supply can be run in walls or overhead thus easier to get to if ever needed.
Other than having to auger out my drain line from my kitchen  I've never needed to mess with the drain lines under the house, so maybe not as much of an issue as I fear.

Tree roots - I imagine those can wreck havoc on a concrete floor. Not sure what to about that other than don't plant trees too close to a barndominium, but I like trees for shade.

The first floor being so close to ground level. I kinda like the idea of the first floor being a step or two higher anyway. The first floor of my current house is a good 30" above the ground.
Not sure what can be done about that.

Any experiences here with post frame houses? What do you like about it? What would you do differently?
Any post frame house nightmares of which to be aware?
Ray
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#7
  Re: Post Frame House/Barndominium ??? by DogwoodTales (So I'm intrigued by ...)
I doubt you're going to find many people to answer that.

What you're talking about with the slab doesn't matter the type of construction.

Normally you build a stem wall to whatever grade level you want.

I've watched the RR videos & seems to me there isn't that much advantage over stick construction other than clear span roof and ceiling height. Considering the cost of lumber nowadays, those 2x6's will add up real fast.

Attaching wallboard to interior walls would have to addressed.
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#8
  Re: RE: Post Frame House/Barndominium ??? by rwe2156 (I doubt you're going...)
(04-06-2021, 10:35 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: I doubt you're going to find many people to answer that.

What you're talking about with the slab doesn't matter the type of construction.

Normally you build a stem wall to whatever grade level you want.

I've watched the RR videos & seems to me there isn't that much advantage over stick construction other than clear span roof and ceiling height.  Considering the cost of lumber nowadays, those 2x6's will add up real fast.

Attaching wallboard to interior walls would have to addressed.

Yeah, very narrow subject with relatively few experiences out there.

I've watch a lot of those RR videos as well and others. Some run purlins on the interior onto which they attach wall board and some install vertical studs on the interior for the same. The cost savings on purlins over studs is not significant to me, but it seems that purlins would be less labor intensive. It seems that the greatest savings are in the foundation first and no need for exterior wall sheathing a distant second. I think there's potential for a greater R value overall due to wall thickness and less wood to transfer heat in/out. Yes the clear span and ceiling height is a nice feature especially given that the same in a stick built would cost a lot more. One more advantage, for someone like myself who wants frame construction to finish off the interior DIY, is that the structure is under roof a lot quicker, which should also translate into less labor $ to get there.
Either way, stick or post, I'm hoping that the supply/demand things balances out and material costs come down some before I get around to building whichever I decide.
Ray
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#9
  Re: Post Frame House/Barndominium ??? by DogwoodTales (So I'm intrigued by ...)
Well, without knowing what part of the country you live, it is difficult to compare.  If you live in the North, heating a building, especially on slab becomes an issue.
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#10
  Re: RE: Post Frame House/Barndominium ??? by aquaticjim (Well, without knowin...)
(04-07-2021, 02:19 PM)aquaticjim Wrote: Well, without knowing what part of the country you live, it is difficult to compare.  If you live in the North, heating a building, especially on slab becomes an issue.

This will be in SE Indiana, outside Cincinnati, OH.
There are bardominiums around here and regular houses with slabs. I think new construction usually gets a heated floor system.
Ray
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