Turning a chalice
#11
  
My priest (Episcopalian) of over 23 years called me yesterday & said he'll be retiring in September. I've had a wonderful relationship with him over the years and would love to make him something thoughtful and unique. I've decided to turn a chalice but would like to have suggestions of wood species anything else. 

TIA

FWIW I've also posted this in woodworking forum
Jim
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#12
  Re: Turning a chalice by Halfathumb ([color=#000000]My pr...)
Any reason for a chalice? He might appreciate a box or something more useful. But, if you're stuck on the chalice idea, I'd ask whether it was going to be used or not. If used, then Burmese teak, African blackwood or some other wood that is close to being impervious to being affected by water.
Cellulose runs through my veins!
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#13
  Re: RE: Turning a chalice by SteveS (Any reason for a cha...)
(04-08-2021, 09:36 AM)SteveS Wrote: Any reason for a chalice? He might appreciate a box or something more useful. But, if you're stuck on the chalice idea, I'd ask whether it was going to be used or not. If used, then Burmese teak, African blackwood or some other wood that is close to being impervious to being affected by water.

Thanks Steve. He's still pretty physically active with Tae Kwon Do and pack packing. Rather remarkable when I think about it. I don't have a lot of experience with turning other than bowls. I've been a ww hobbyist for over 30 years but have shied away from turning just because I haven't used a lathe very much since HS but want to get some poplar to experiment with prior to turning the real thing. After this project I plan to turn finals and the like since I really like to build furniture.

Jim
Jim
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#14
  Re: Turning a chalice by Halfathumb ([color=#000000]My pr...)
Poplar is a good practice wood to get your basic skills back, but you may find it frustrating if you use it to practice thin-wall, deep bowls like you will be doing for a chalice.

When you get to that stage of practice, you might consider maple for practice. 

Looks like they are almost out of stock, but I have had good luck with the 4"x4"x12" KD Soft Maple Wood Spindle Blank (Rough Sawn) from the "Got Wood?" folks.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#15
  Re: Turning a chalice by Halfathumb ([color=#000000]My pr...)
Also very good for practice for basic turning are green tree limbs. Cut easily and great for practice. Not much good for anything other than spindle work, but free. And free is always good.

GM
The only tool I have is a lathe.  Everything else is an accessory.
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#16
  Re: Turning a chalice by Halfathumb ([color=#000000]My pr...)
Olive wood

plus seventeen
Know Guns. Know Security. Know Freedom - - - No Guns. No Security. No Freedom

Guns are supposed to be dangerous. If yours is not dangerous you need to take it to a gunsmith and have it repaired.
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#17
  Re: RE: Turning a chalice by 6270_Productions (Olive wood [size=...)
(04-10-2021, 09:37 AM)6270_Productions Wrote: Olive wood

plus seventeen

Someone on FWW suggested Bethlehem Olive wood but also said it's rather hard to get a hold of & costly.
Jim
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#18
  Re: RE: Turning a chalice by Halfathumb ([quote='6270_Product...)
(04-12-2021, 08:30 AM)Halfathumb Wrote: Someone on FWW suggested Bethlehem Olive wood but also said it's rather hard to get a hold of & costly.

". . . hard to get a hold of & costly."

All the good stuff is.  That is what makes it nice . . . and memorable.
Know Guns. Know Security. Know Freedom - - - No Guns. No Security. No Freedom

Guns are supposed to be dangerous. If yours is not dangerous you need to take it to a gunsmith and have it repaired.
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#19
  Re: RE: Turning a chalice by SteveS (Any reason for a cha...)
(04-08-2021, 09:36 AM)SteveS Wrote: Any reason for a chalice? He might appreciate a box or something more useful. But, if you're stuck on the chalice idea, I'd ask whether it was going to be used or not. If used, then Burmese teak, African blackwood or some other wood that is close to being impervious to being affected by water.

Alternatively, any diffuse porous wood with an impervious finish will do for a quick quaff.  Don't expect anything to hold liquid too long.  I use the domestic stuff like cherry, maple or birch.  Limbs fine, or use a stem and bowl of contrasting woods.

Or, for a joke, spindle-oriented red oak.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#20
  Re: Turning a chalice by Halfathumb ([color=#000000]My pr...)
Second the motion for olive wood. "Expensive" is a relative term. Olive wood turns very nicely and contact with liquid shouldn't be an issue. Turn the bowl of the chalice before you turn the stem. This is a case where slow and steady wins the race. Plenty of YouTube videos out there showing the process.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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