Turning a chalice
#15
  Re: Turning a chalice by Halfathumb ([color=#000000]My pr...)
I've ordered olive wood from Bethlehem. Cost of shipping is more than the wood which doesn't surprise me. 5-15 day shipping $50. I had to order 4 blanks of 2.5 X 2.5 X 4 each. 
Don't know yet what glue to use to put them all together for turning and what contrasting wood to use for the stem and base. Suggestions welcome.

Jim
Jim
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#16
  Re: RE: Turning a chalice by Halfathumb (I've ordered olive w...)
(04-13-2021, 08:25 AM)Halfathumb Wrote: I've ordered olive wood from Bethlehem. Cost of shipping is more than the wood which doesn't surprise me. 5-15 day shipping $50. I had to order 4 blanks of 2.5 X 2.5 X 4 each. 
Don't know yet what glue to use to put them all together for turning and what contrasting wood to use for the stem and base. Suggestions welcome.

Jim

Definitely do not use CA glue. It breaks down over time.

You want a waterproof glue.

I still think that a rosewood would be a good choice for the stem if you are not allergic to it yet.
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#17
  Re: Turning a chalice by Halfathumb ([color=#000000]My pr...)
(04-08-2021, 07:16 AM)Halfathumb Wrote: My priest (Episcopalian) of over 23 years called me yesterday & said he'll be retiring in September. I've had a wonderful relationship with him over the years and would love to make him something thoughtful and unique. I've decided to turn a chalice but would like to have suggestions of wood species anything else. 

TIA

FWIW I've also posted this in woodworking forum

I love the idea but allow me to jump in with some experience from a different perspective.

For some churches wood is not used (or not allowed to be used) as a chalice as it is a very porous material.  When you are consecrating something sacred in the chalice the ability to fully purify and clean out the cup is essential.

I'm not sure about the rules for the Episcopalian community that your friend is in (they vary) but it is very possible that you'd want to line the cup with a metal liner of some sorts to avoid the issues around the porous nature of the wood and the problems around purification.

In my church (I'm not Episcopalian) wood isn't allowed for sacred vessels (chalice and ciborium) for these reasons.  So we use metal for our chalices.

Does that make sense?
Peter

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#18
  Re: RE: Turning a chalice by Peter Tremblay ([quote='Halfathumb' ...)
(Yesterday, 10:17 AM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: In my church (I'm not Episcopalian) wood isn't allowed for sacred vessels (chalice and ciborium) for these reasons.  So we use metal for our chalices.

Does that make sense?

Consubstantiation vs transubstantiation doctrine is the difference, though a retired priest wouldn't, I think use the gift in the eucharist.
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