Paving question
#20
  Re: Paving question by CEPenworks (I live on a shared p...)
I put filings on my own drive and rolled it with a 2ton roller. I have no complaints but when talking about paving the shared drive my wife said she doesn't want what I put on our drive. I haven't had any problems but what kind of maintenance do you need to do with millings so they don't start cracking and breaking up?

What kills me is one of the previous owners said his brother had come to him with free millings if we wanted them and never said anything. This could have been taken care of years ago.
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#21
  Re: Paving question by CEPenworks (I live on a shared p...)
I just looked online for the area where I live.  You have to file for a permit to pave and they will issue the specifications at that time.  You have to pay a fee to apply and you have to allow their inspectors to inspect the work as it is being done. 

They also require $2,000,000.00 of liability insurance for the contractor.  

The county can also require traffic control devices be installed (traffic lights).  You want to have a definite commitment from the county that they will not require a traffic light.  Traffic lights cost between $250,000.00 and $500,000.00 each including installation.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#22
  Re: RE: Paving question by Cooler (I just looked online...)
(05-06-2021, 03:36 PM)Cooler Wrote: I just looked online for the area where I live.  You have to file for a permit to pave and they will issue the specifications at that time.  You have to pay a fee to apply and you have to allow their inspectors to inspect the work as it is being done. 

They also require $2,000,000.00 of liability insurance for the contractor.  

The county can also require traffic control devices be installed (traffic lights).  You want to have a definite commitment from the county that they will not require a traffic light.  Traffic lights cost between $250,000.00 and $500,000.00 each including installation.

????
permit for having your driveway done?  that is crazy!

They would seriously consider a traffic light for a driveway?  Do they do that for EVERY driveway installed or resurfaced?  Surely not.  Do they mean temporary traffic control so the construction doesn't cause an accident?
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#23
  Re: RE: Paving question by JosephP ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(05-06-2021, 08:36 PM)JosephP Wrote: ????
permit for having your driveway done?  that is crazy!

They would seriously consider a traffic light for a driveway?  Do they do that for EVERY driveway installed or resurfaced?  Surely not.  Do they mean temporary traffic control so the construction doesn't cause an accident?

The original poster was not talking about a driveway.  He was talking about an access road to his and his neighbors' driveways.  The county might require a permit for that.  And if they consider it an improved road, they probably will require some signage, but you cannot rule out requiring a traffic signal until they rule it out. 

He does not say how many houses are connected to the access road or if it dead-ends at the main road, or if it continues across the main road. 

In the absence of any detailed description of this access road, I don't see how my comment is off-base.  I can say with certainty that a permit would be required for an access road modification like that where I live. 

You would not need a permit for a new driveway to your own home.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#24
  Re: RE: Paving question by Cooler ([quote='JosephP' pid...)
(05-07-2021, 08:06 AM)Cooler Wrote: The original poster was not talking about a driveway.  He was talking about an access road to his and his neighbors' driveways.  The county might require a permit for that.  And if they consider it an improved road, they probably will require some signage, but you cannot rule out requiring a traffic signal until they rule it out. 

He does not say how many houses are connected to the access road or if it dead-ends at the main road, or if it continues across the main road. 

In the absence of any detailed description of this access road, I don't see how my comment is off-base.  I can say with certainty that a permit would be required for an access road modification like that where I live. 

You would not need a permit for a new driveway to your own home.

Pretty sure the OP is talking about a private driveway that is shared between a few homes. That is not what you describe.

They are very common where I live and no permits would be needed here. Typically its to give lots that have no public road frontage access through a right of way and many times it connects a couple lots together across a common right of way over someone else's property.
There are 10 types of people in the world: those who can read binary code and those who can't.

"To be against hunting, fishing and trapping you have to be spiritually stupid." Ted Nugent
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#25
  Re: RE: Paving question by Cub_Cadet_GT ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(05-07-2021, 10:36 AM)Cub_Cadet_GT Wrote: Pretty sure the OP is talking about a private driveway that is shared between a few homes. That is not what you describe.

They are very common where I live and no permits would be needed here. Typically its to give lots that have no public road frontage access through a right of way and many times it connects a couple lots together across a common right of way over someone else's property.

I don't see that in New York.  I have seen rear alleyways in Chicago.  They are not maintained by the city.  I don't know the regulations for those roads either.  But if they were in sufficient disrepair the city would require its maintenance.  I imagine fire engines would have to use those access roads if there was a fire, so the city would have a legitimate reason for demanding that the roads be maintained.


No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#26
  Re: Paving question by CEPenworks (I live on a shared p...)
There are 4 homes on the drive. It is about 600' long and dead ends at the main road.

We had a contractor out last night. He feels the base is good to go with some regrading. He will check how deep the base goes when he grades. He was then going to top with a couple inches of 1&0 to make it level then a couple inches of asphalt. The other issue is going to be width. Currently it is about 16' wide. His machines can do 13' or 17'+. Since the first half of the road is built up 17' would hang over the slope on either side. Some of the others are pushing for 13' but I think that is going to feel very cramped. The contractor suggested to bring top soil up to the edge of the pavement once it has cured and seed it to support the edge of the pavement. So if only 13' if someone is walking their dog up the drive and a car needs to pass someone is going in the grass. Some of these people are very picky about their grass. I come back to wonder why someone bought a house in a rural area on a gravel drive when they want a pretty finished looking drive? I bought in a rural area with a gravel drive because I didn't want a fancy drive that had to be maintained.
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#27
  Re: RE: Paving question by Cooler ([quote='Cub_Cadet_GT...)
Cooler
I don't see that in New York.  I have seen rear alleyways in Chicago.  They are not maintained by the city.  I don't know the regulations for those roads either.  But if they were in sufficient disrepair the city would require its maintenance.  I imagine fire engines would have to use those access roads if there was a fire, so the city would have a legitimate reason for demanding that the roads be maintained.




A whole different world exists outside of NY.  Big Grin
There are 10 types of people in the world: those who can read binary code and those who can't.

"To be against hunting, fishing and trapping you have to be spiritually stupid." Ted Nugent
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#28
  Re: RE: Paving question by Cooler ([quote='JosephP' pid...)
(05-07-2021, 08:06 AM)Cooler Wrote: The original poster was not talking about a driveway.  He was talking about an access road to his and his neighbors' driveways.  The county might require a permit for that.  And if they consider it an improved road, they probably will require some signage, but you cannot rule out requiring a traffic signal until they rule it out. 

...
OK...I see where you were coming from.
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