how to make this box
#7
  
Looks like the wood is sliced, but how to get it square and uniform to make cubes from showing the growth rings. guessing it is 1/2"=3/4"


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#8
  Re: how to make this box by Woodworm! (Looks like the wood ...)
It’s slices of end grain; mill first, then cut off equal thicknesses.
It could be a 2X4 of old growth pine.
Gary

Please don’t quote the trolls.
Liberty, Freedom and Individual Responsibility
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#9
  Re: how to make this box by Woodworm! (Looks like the wood ...)
I'd start by finding a few 3/4" boards with the center of the heart on both ends. rip a 3/4" strip keeping the center on both ends. I'll need 5 or six of these pieces about 2' long. Edge glue the strips together (like butcher-block) and run thru the thickness planer to clean up both faces. Cut the new board into 5 pieces and glue together. Clean up the sides and then cut to length.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#10
  Re: how to make this box by Woodworm! (Looks like the wood ...)
Thanks for the ideas.
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#11
  Re: how to make this box by Woodworm! (Looks like the wood ...)
Almost looks like it's made from smaller branches seeing the tight grain and a lot of small knots.  When I trim lower branches from jack pines on our property, they look a lot like it.  Of course milling those would take some patience Big Grin
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#12
  Re: how to make this box by Woodworm! (Looks like the wood ...)
    Look at the background on this tabletop. This was built by Gerrit Jensen if I’m not mistaken. Late XIIIX Century. (English, Jensen was a Huguenot immigrant)
This type of woodwork with the end grain veneers put together like tiles is called oyster work, or sometimes oyster marquetry.
The Australian blogger, “Jack Plane” constructed a walnut tea table with oyster work. You can see how he did it here: https://pegsandtails.wordpress.com/2009/...a-table-2/

(I devour everything on this blog. The man’s knowledge and skills are superlative.)
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