I am waterstone curious
#21
  Re: I am waterstone curious by clovishound (I've always avoided ...)
Skip it. I agree the EF diasharp isn’t fine enough to be your final grit. Before switching to water stones, pick up a spyderco ceramic stone for finishing. I spray it with windex, but you don’t have to. Ceramic is a nice compliment to the diamond plates. Black or translucent Arkansas would also be good choices.

One advantage of hard matrix stones is their ability to shape small tools, curved tools etc. Wet stones handle wide blades and flat surfaces better. Shaptons glass stones are outliers and act more like Arkansas, but cut fast or faster.
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#22
  Re: RE: I am waterstone curious by adamcherubini (Skip it. I agree the...)
(06-03-2021, 06:33 AM)adamcherubini Wrote: Skip it. I agree the EF diasharp isn’t fine enough to be your final grit. Before switching to water stones, pick up a spyderco ceramic stone for finishing. I spray it with windex, but you don’t have to. Ceramic is a nice compliment to the diamond plates. Black or translucent Arkansas would also be good choices.

One advantage of hard matrix stones is their ability to shape small tools, curved tools etc. Wet stones handle wide blades and flat surfaces better. Shaptons glass stones are outliers and act more like Arkansas, but cut fast or faster.

I have a black Arkansas stone. The only issue I have with it, is that it cuts VERY slowly.
"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
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#23
  Re: RE: I am waterstone curious by clovishound ([quote='adamcherubin...)
(06-03-2021, 10:05 AM)clovishound Wrote: I have a black Arkansas stone. The only issue I have with it, is that it cuts VERY slowly.
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Have you ever tried diamond paste on a glass plate?....Cuts fast and is readily available in a number of grit sizes...or you can buy diamond powder and mix with petroleum jelly for as high a concentrate as you want..Amazon has it...cuts quickly, cleans up with paper towels...I am surprised that more people don't use it but maybe it's because it is not well known and very few that do use it don't talk about it very often...Woodcraft used to sell a sharpening kit with several different grits of diamond paste and a piece of plate glass. I still have mine. Boron Carbide powder works well also but the really fine grits aren't readily available anywhere I know of. I do have some that is 600grit.

edit....That kit also contained several rectangles of MDF that could also be used..
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#24
  Re: RE: I am waterstone curious by clovishound ([quote='adamcherubin...)
(06-03-2021, 10:05 AM)clovishound Wrote: I have a black Arkansas stone. The only issue I have with it, is that it cuts VERY slowly.
Could be clogged. Hose it down with wd-40 or atf. Needs a light oil in use and to clean.

Shouldn’t be cutting much with this stone. Best for micro bevels, not a wide flat bevel.

I think I start a re-hone with DMT fine (600), then extra fine (1200) then Arkansas or ceramic. I don’t always strop. The spyderco stones aren’t expensive. Give one a try.
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#25
  Re: I am waterstone curious by clovishound (I've always avoided ...)
When I use the black arkansas, it is normally after establishing an edge and working up to something 800 grit or higher. I find it works well for a kitchen knife that needs touch up, not a full resharpen. I may be using too thick an oil. I have been using mineral oil lately.
"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
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#26
  Re: RE: I am waterstone curious by clovishound (When I use the black...)
(06-04-2021, 12:16 AM)clovishound Wrote: When I use the black arkansas, it is normally after establishing an edge and working up to something 800 grit or higher. I find it works well for a kitchen knife that needs touch up, not a full resharpen. I may be using too thick an oil. I have been using mineral oil lately.

The viscosity of the oil has to be proportionate to the size of the pores in the stone. Mineral oil like 3 in 1 will work well on Carborundum. I think it’s too heavy for washita and way too heavy for hard Arkansas. Don’t be afraid to run stones through the dishwasher.

Remember the oil is a surfactant with sufficient surface tension to float metal particles, keeping them from clogging the stone”s pores, but also a low enough surface tension to allow the blade to rub on the top of the stone without floating on a oil film.

Sorry for mansplaining if everybody knew this.
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#27
  Re: RE: I am waterstone curious by adamcherubini ([quote='clovishound'...)
(06-04-2021, 06:35 AM)adamcherubini Wrote:  Don’t be afraid to run stones through the dishwasher.

You don't know my wife.
"Mongo only pawn in game of life."        Mongo
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#28
  Re: RE: I am waterstone curious by clovishound ([quote='adamcherubin...)
(06-04-2021, 10:02 AM)clovishound Wrote: You don't know my wife.
...................
The bad thing about using any oil is that it oxidizes and turns to "varnish" in the pores of the stone, clogging them and impeding their abrasiveness..You can remove it by washing the stone with lacquer thinner..Instead of oil for honing, I use mineral spirits or paint thinner..It does not oxidize, it evaporates and the stone's pores do not clog. Plus it is very thin...another good thing..thick honing oil has the effect that's kinda like paving over a rough surface road.
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korean War 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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#29
  Re: RE: I am waterstone curious by Timberwolf ([quote='clovishound'...)
(06-04-2021, 12:32 PM)Timberwolf Wrote: ...................
The bad thing about using any oil is that it oxidizes and turns to "varnish" in the pores of the stone, clogging them and impeding their abrasiveness..You can remove it by washing the stone with lacquer thinner..Instead of oil for honing, I use mineral spirits or paint thinner..It does not oxidize, it evaporates and the stone's pores do not clog. Plus it is very thin...another good thing..thick honing oil has the effect that's kinda like paving over a rough surface road.

Mineral oil won't oxidize or turn to varnish.  But, as Adam mentioned, it's probably too thick to be very effective on a harder Arkansas stone.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#30
  Re: I am waterstone curious by clovishound (I've always avoided ...)
You can use soapy water. Windex may work. As for the dishwasher, lots of mineral oils are food safe. And we put way nastier cookware in our dishwashers. It’s not a real concern. You can always soak them in hot soapy water.
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