Finish question on Pine
#11
  
My wife wanted me to make two shelves for DVDs and since we had alot of 1x pine she asked for that.

For the stain to look good and spread well without blotching how do i do the process.

Thanks
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
Reply
#12
  Re: Finish question on Pine by Arlin Eastman (My wife wanted me to...)
I met Norm Abrams at the National Hardware Show in Chicago a number of years ago.  He told me he always used Minwax's Polyshades for pine.  That is what I've been using ever since.

A lot of people badmouth Minwax, probably because it is the finish Uncle Irving and Aunt Tilda use.  Yes, it is available everywhere.  It is priced fairly.  I prefer the oil based ones which self level when brushing, but the water based when I spray. 

Make up your own mind.  Buy a really small can and try it out on a sample. The finish will get darker with each coat, so when you reach the right color, switch to clear.  I use gloss for all but the final coat.  Then if I want satin, I use one coat of satin. 

It is dry to the touch in about 6 to 8 hours.  You can give it light use after 24 hours.  The "full cure" is 200 hours (about 7 days), but it continues to get harder over time.

My 20 year old finish is impossible to mar with the edge of a nickel.  No  scraping off of the finish or plastic deformation (indents) no matter how hard I press on the finish.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#13
  Re: Finish question on Pine by Arlin Eastman (My wife wanted me to...)
Sealing with shellac or using a blotch control product like Charles Neil's is essential.

Gel stains used as a glazing might be the best option.

It depends on the type of pine and how many (if any) knots. That's where the real difficulty lies.

You'll have to experiment with what you've got.

Or check into the Japanese burning technique (can't remember name).
Reply
#14
  Re: Finish question on Pine by Arlin Eastman (My wife wanted me to...)
Thanks guys

I will try the minwax since I think I have some of it.

I forgot all about  Charles Neil and I talked to him and friends with him for many years and he told me how to make it.  I just have to remember where i put the info.


Also do I put on the shellac before or after?


And yes it has a few knots.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
Reply
#15
  Re: RE: Finish question on Pine by rwe2156 (Sealing with shellac...)
(06-03-2021, 08:27 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: Sealing with shellac or using a blotch control product like Charles Neil's is essential.

Gel stains used as a glazing might be the best option.

It depends on the type of pine and how many (if any) knots.  That's where the real difficulty lies.

You'll have to experiment with what you've got.

Or check into the Japanese burning technique (can't remember name).
shou sugi ban.  Not only a visual change, it enhances the durability of the wood in outdoor settings.  It is used for siding.

https://www.architecturaldigest.com/stor...-furniture

While shou sugi ban (焼杉板) originated in Japan in the 18th century primarily as way to treat cedar siding to make it weatherproof, the technique—which involves charring a wood surface to render it a deep charcoal-black—has caught on recently as a treatment for contemporary exteriors and indoor furnishings alike. You can even find variations elevated to fine art, as in the work of the artist Maarten Baas. The gravitas imparted by the process and finished result (called yakisugi) are undeniable, a blackening of the wood that reveals clean, distinct lines and an inherent textural beauty.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#16
  Re: RE: Finish question on Pine by Arlin Eastman (Thanks guys I wil...)
(06-03-2021, 12:08 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Thanks guys

I will try the minwax since I think I have some of it.

I forgot all about  Charles Neil and I talked to him and friends with him for many years and he told me how to make it.  I just have to remember where i put the info.


Also do I put on the shellac before or after?


And yes it has a few knots.

Let us know how it works out.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
Reply
#17
  Re: RE: Finish question on Pine by Arlin Eastman (Thanks guys I wil...)
(06-03-2021, 12:08 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Thanks guys

I will try the minwax since I think I have some of it.

I forgot all about  Charles Neil and I talked to him and friends with him for many years and he told me how to make it.  I just have to remember where i put the info.


Also do I put on the shellac before or after?


And yes it has a few knots.

I always use a spit coat of shellac, about  1/2 to 3/4 lb cut, as a sealer on pine (or cherry for that matter) when staining.  Works for me.  if you have flakes, this chart helps with the cut: https://www.shellac.net/PoundCutChart.html ; if using Zinnzer, I think they have a 3 lb cut in the can, so thin with MS accordingly.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
Reply
#18
  Re: Finish question on Pine by Arlin Eastman (My wife wanted me to...)
MinWax Antique Cherry is a good color for pine. It's important that you don’t reverse the grain by using too dark a stain. That’d what gave pine a bad name in the '70’s.
Carolyn

Trip Blog for Twelve Countries:   [url=http://www.woodworkingtraveler.wordpress.com[/url]

"It's good to know, but it's better to understand."  Auze Jackson
Reply
#19
  Re: Finish question on Pine by Arlin Eastman (My wife wanted me to...)
So how does the stain get into the wood if it is sealed by shellac first????
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
Reply
#20
  Re: Finish question on Pine by Arlin Eastman (My wife wanted me to...)
I have had great luck with BIX pre-stain conditioner. No waiting, just get it wet and then apply stain. Of course, you should test on your wood first. Problem is that BIX is very difficult to find. I got my in a close out at the hardware store. I like it so much I ration it's use. I'm sure there are others just as good but this is what I use. Terrific results.
Was living the good retired life on the Lake. Now just living retired.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.