Please help me with lacquer
#11
  
Project: Kitchen reface
Product: Target Coatings High Build Lacquer
Sprayer: Earlex Sprayport 6003, 1.3mm tip

The last 2 doors I noticed a distinct difference in the texture and appearance (passes the noiseless rub test). They look great.

The other doors do not have the same look. My thoughts are its simply not enough finish.

My confusion is I used the same number of coats on those 2 doors and sprayed the same way as all the others. It looked like I was laying down the same amount of material, 2 coats.

The previous doors I thinned the lacquer, but not very much, maybe 5-10%, only b/c it looked a little thick going through the strainer. Subsequently, I realized I could spray unthinned just fine.

I resprayed 2 coats on the other doors, and they are better, but STILL, I did did not get the build and look as the 2 doors mentioned above.

Many of the surfaces do not pass the "noiseless rub test" IOW they feel bit sandy.

I started the project when it was fairly cool and lower humidity, ended up a couple weeks ago spraying in fairly high humidity, 90-95°.

We have swamp conditions now, I'm planning to wait until better weather and want to respray.

Is it just simply not spraying thick enough or not enough coats? Honestly I was spraying fairly thick, noticing bridging where the panel meets the sides, so I backed off several times. Does high humidity cause the sandy texture?

Any and all suggestions or criticisms much appreciated!! I'm not a newbie, I have a lot of experience doing things the wrong way LOL.
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#12
  Re: Please help me with lacquer by rwe2156 (Project: Kitchen ref...)
Adjust to have more fluid pass through the nozzle.  It's possible the air in the turbine was getting too warm and partially drying the finish before it made it to the doors given that it's the last 2 doors with the issues.
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#13
  Re: RE: Please help me with lacquer by WoodworkerTom (Adjust to have more ...)
What Tom said.  A rough, gritty texture means the finish is drying before it has a chance to flow out.  This is consistent with the lower humidity when you sprayed those doors.  As Tom also said, turbines generate hot air and that contributes to faster drying.  But since you were getting bridging spraying heavier coats is not a good thing to do.  Instead, I would get some Extender and add that to your finish.  I believe Target makes one; if not, I'll be GF's product will work just fine with it.  3 - 5% normally is sufficient.  

John
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#14
  Re: Please help me with lacquer by rwe2156 (Project: Kitchen ref...)
I talked to Jeff Weiss at Target today, he suggested the reason for the difference in the last 2 doors being more glossy was not stirring the product enough to work the flattening agent in. Thinking about it, I think he's right.

@ John I was spraying the uppers a couple months ago in lower humidity the finish was drying to the touch in 20-30 minutes. The lowers I sprayed when it was warmer, finish was dry to the touch in 10 minutes & those are the ones I'm feeling more grittiness on. I have the darn extender and didn't use it.

My plan is to leave things alone, wait for better weather, and if I'm still not happy with it in a few month, I'll recoat.
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#15
  Re: Please help me with lacquer by rwe2156 (Project: Kitchen ref...)
I used to always mix in retarder when the weather was 90 or above.
Rain......forget it, do something else. Sand maybe? Lol
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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#16
  Re: Please help me with lacquer by rwe2156 (Project: Kitchen ref...)
(06-21-2021, 08:40 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: I started the project when it was fairly cool and lower humidity, ended up a couple weeks ago spraying in fairly high humidity, 90-95°.

You probably answered your own question here.

You are getting what is called a "dry finish". This usually happens when there is either not enough finish leaving the gun or because the finish is drying before it hits your target. As mentioned above, a retarder will help. Or a larger dia. spray tip but my guess is the temperature. You can also try cooling your finish before you spray. But test it first. Sometimes it has the opposite affect as it may thicken the finish so it does not atomize as it should.
Neil Summers Home Inspections


When it comes to 'lectricity, I'm a pretty good wood turner.

... Grey Mountain 3/2/21

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#17
  Re: Please help me with lacquer by rwe2156 (Project: Kitchen ref...)
I did not think about hot weather/hot air from turbine - I think that's the answer b/c it definitely looked like the last doors did not have as much finish on them, thanks WWTom.

As mentioned, I had the Target extender and didn't think about using it DUH.

In the future, I guess I should go with a standard compressor driven sprayer when it s hot?
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#18
  Re: Please help me with lacquer by rwe2156 (Project: Kitchen ref...)
Thats all I ever used in the kitchen cabinet business. A HVLP gun
Steve

Missouri






 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020








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#19
  Re: RE: Please help me with lacquer by rwe2156 (I did not think abou...)
(06-24-2021, 09:03 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: I did not think about hot weather/hot air from turbine - I think that's the answer b/c it definitely looked like the last doors did not have as much finish on them, thanks WWTom.

As mentioned, I had the Target extender and didn't think about using it DUH.

In the future, I guess I should go with a standard compressor driven sprayer when it s hot?

That will help but it's still no guarantee of success.  Always spray a test panel, each day, before you start your project.  That will tell you if your gun set up is good or you need to make adjustments.  It doesn't have to be fancy; just a 12 x 12 piece of plywood, etc will tell you whether the spray pattern is good and whether it flows out.  

John
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#20
  Re: Please help me with lacquer by rwe2156 (Project: Kitchen ref...)
I think you may have too small a needle/nozzle in you gun. 

I’m basing this off of you saying that you thinned the first batch; and all was well.  You also said there didn’t appear to be as much finish on the 2nd set.  The 2nd batch wasn’t “atomizing” properly because it was too thick to be pushed through your gun by the 3 stage turbine.  

A wet film thickness gauge can help you determine if your laying down the proper “thickness” of coating. The coating’s data sheet will tell you the correct thickness.  This isn’t a plug an play solution though.  You can achieve the correct applied thickness , but if it wasn’t atomized properly ; you’ll still have a flawed surface. 

I’m not convinced that the turbine is overheating the air at the gun inlet.  It’s only two doors we’re talking about here. The run time must have been short. Especially since there were no test pieces shot. 

What did your viscosity cup tell you ?
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