DIAMOND SHARPENING STONES
#10
  
aRE THEY WORTH THE PRICE FOR CHISEL AND PLANER BLAFDE SHARPENINF? iF SO, WHAT BRands and grits dp y'\'all reommmend. Thanks for any info.
Reply
#11
  Re: DIAMOND SHARPENING STONES by weelis (aRE THEY WORTH THE P...)
(07-10-2021, 07:24 PM)weelis Wrote: aRE THEY WORTH THE PRICE FOR CHISEL AND PLANER BLAFDE SHARPENINF?  iF SO, WHAT BRands and grits dp y'\'all reommmend.  Thanks for any info.
...........
Yes, they are worth it...But you can save some bucks on diamond hones by using diamond coated steel discs..an 8" diameter disc has fifty square inches of diamonds in the grit of your choice...I use the 8" on my Veritas and the 6" diameter laps on my WorkSharp. But I also use them OFF the machines as a conventional hone. I have diamond laps in grits ranging from 180 to 3,000, purchased online at Amazon. I choose the laps consisting of a steel plate with diamond grit electroplated on the whole surface. They cut extremely fast and last a long time and IMO they are the greatest bang for the buck...Why pay fifty bucks for a rectangular plate with just a very few square inches????...You're not going to use the corners of the conventional hones anyway...You can sharpen lots of tools on these plates, including scissors.......BTW...These plates are DEAD FLAT, they are steel and are approx.35thou thickness..not flimsy sheet metal...

[Image: fullsizeoutput-114c.jpg]

https://www.amazon.com/DrilaxTM-Professi...184&sr=8-6

And an even better deal......>>>

https://www.amazon.com/Diamond-Polishing...004&sr=8-8
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





Reply
#12
  Re: DIAMOND SHARPENING STONES by weelis (aRE THEY WORTH THE P...)
(07-10-2021, 07:24 PM)weelis Wrote: aRE THEY WORTH THE PRICE FOR CHISEL AND PLANER BLAFDE SHARPENINF?  iF SO, WHAT BRands and grits dp y'\'all reommmend.  Thanks for any info.

It’s always surprising when I see the complex systems some people use. The little rectangular diamond plates work for chisels. Also planer blades if a jig is used to hold the blades firm at the correct angle.

If need be, I start with a 600 grit, then progress to 6,000. They cut quickly at first, but seem to get slower with use. Used dry, or with oil, or with water, seems to work either way.
Reply
#13
  Re: DIAMOND SHARPENING STONES by weelis (aRE THEY WORTH THE P...)
If you get nice, flat plates, yes. If you get cheap ones, no. DMT and Atoma are two reputable companies that make diamond stones for sharpening.

I'm not exactly sure why Petertaylor would say you need a jig for plane blades. To be honest, you don't need a jig for any blade as long as you can hold it at a consistent angle to the stone. And that would be true for any sharpening media: water stone, oil stone, natural Arkansas stone, sandpaper, etc.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
Reply
#14
  Re: DIAMOND SHARPENING STONES by weelis (aRE THEY WORTH THE P...)
I think he's saying the jig is needed for planer blades for a stationary power tool, not plane blades.  I'd go along with that, even though this is the hand tool forum.
Reply
#15
  Re: DIAMOND SHARPENING STONES by weelis (aRE THEY WORTH THE P...)
(07-10-2021, 07:24 PM)weelis Wrote: aRE THEY WORTH THE PRICE FOR CHISEL AND PLANER BLAFDE SHARPENINF?

Well like most things, it depends...
because worth the price depends on the what the buyer considers the worth and price.

As for diamond sharpening stones I have found the Atoma brand to be very good.
You can see them here on Amazon They are good value for the money in my opinion.

I own the 140 400 600 1200 and each have given me excellent service and serve different uses.
In researching I found these to have the highest rating for use and flatness as reflected in the cost.

As for my use, I use them to get me to where I want before going to sharpening stones.
In other words, for me they are for roughing/profiling before getting the polished edge on stones.

Diamond sharping aside, I think you'll find it difficult to sharpen planer blades on anything shorter than the blades.
As for the chisels the diamond plates will do fine.
Reply
#16
  Re: RE: DIAMOND SHARPENING STONES by wood-chips ([quote='weelis' pid=...)
(07-14-2021, 05:05 PM)wood-chips Wrote: Well like most things, it depends...
because worth the price depends on the what the buyer considers the worth and price.

As for diamond sharpening stones I have found the Atoma brand to be very good.
You can see them here on Amazon They are good value for the money in my opinion.

I own the 140 400 600 1200 and each have given me excellent service and serve different uses.
In researching I found these to have the highest rating for use and flatness as reflected in the cost.

As for my use, I use them to get me to where I want before going to sharpening stones.
In other words, for me they are for roughing/profiling before getting the polished edge on stones.

Diamond sharping aside, I think you'll find it difficult to sharpen planer blades on anything shorter than the blades.
As for the chisels the diamond plates will do fine.
.................................
I think you'll find it difficult to sharpen planer blades on anything shorter than the blades.

He may mean hand plane blades rather than machine planer blades..For those, I use a Reliant similar to this one.,

[Image: C500101-E-4-EDB-4-A9-B-ABC7-72362-D20-D184-4-5005-c.jpg]
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





Reply
#17
  Re: DIAMOND SHARPENING STONES by weelis (aRE THEY WORTH THE P...)
I really like diamond stones/plates but I mostly use them for my HSS chisels and plane irons. Harder steels also. 

I have DMT (interrupted plates) Venev double sided plates and have tried the Naniwa single side plates. They all are very slow to wear or dish. They are expensive but some waterstones are too. They really last and require the least amount of maintenance.

I generally compare using the Micron designation than the Grit designation since there are different standards in use. I might suggest... 50/40 micron is a good start for coarse...20/14 micron for medium...7/5 for fine.

Most are used with a splash of water and I usually clean mine with a red scotch brite pad or a 8K King Nagura stone I found on Amazon.

If you like to hollow grind your bevels a 8" CBN wheel (180 GRIT) is a great start followed by your stones. The Worksharp is another excellent idea for flat wheels.
Reply
#18
  Re: RE: DIAMOND SHARPENING STONES by Bad Splinter (I really like diamon...)
(07-17-2021, 09:43 AM)Bad Splinter Wrote: I really like diamond stones/plates but I mostly use them for my HSS chisels and plane irons. Harder steels also. 

I have DMT (interrupted plates) Venev double sided plates and have tried the Naniwa single side plates. They all are very slow to wear or dish. They are expensive but some waterstones are too. They really last and require the least amount of maintenance.

I generally compare using the Micron designation than the Grit designation since there are different standards in use. I might suggest... 50/40 micron is a good start for coarse...20/14 micron for medium...7/5 for fine.

Most are used with a splash of water and I usually clean mine with a red scotch brite pad or a 8K King Nagura stone I found on Amazon.

If you like to hollow grind your bevels a 8" CBN wheel (180 GRIT) is a great start followed by your stones. The Worksharp is another excellent idea for flat wheels.

.............................
The Worksharp is a great idea for flat diamond laps also...here's one of mine...Diamond plate is steel, very flat and cost about $11.00 including shipping..These things work!!!!!!!

[Image: y-BPJSDE9-Ra-Kruwb0mj-S4-AA.jpg]
"If you don't read newspapers you're uninformed...If you do read newspapers, you're misinformed.....Mark Twain

Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea, the Forgotten War 50/55
Get off my lawn !
Upset





Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work around the shop. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.